STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE: Blog http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog en-us (C) STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) Sat, 24 Feb 2018 14:55:00 GMT Sat, 24 Feb 2018 14:55:00 GMT http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/img/s/v-5/u22237431-o464123527-50.jpg STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE: Blog http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog 120 100 DARLINGTON CORPORATION TRANSPORT http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/darlington-corporation-transport DARLINGTON CORPORATION TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT

 

DARLINGTON TRAM NETWORK

 

Trams ran from 1st June 1904 and finished on 11th April 1926.

 

 

 

DARLINGTON TROLLEYBUS NETWORK

 

FIRST ROUTE OPENED 17TH JANUARY 1926

​LAST ROUTE CLOSED 31ST JULY 1957

 

BELOW IS A SELECTION OF PICTURES OF DARLINGTON CORPORATION DAIMLER CCG5S

 

 

 

 

 

 

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stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/darlington-corporation-transport Sat, 24 Feb 2018 14:54:33 GMT
LEARNING TO DRIVE A BUS http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/learning-to-drive-a-bus LEARNING TO DRIVE A BUS

For those of you who may be interested, it is now more than 44 years since I passed my PSV (Public Service  Vehicle) Driving Test.
(We will not bother with the new PCV title. This web site is stuck firmly in the past.)
I passed on Thursday 23rd January 1972 in Nottingham with the well know PSV Driving School, Wallace School of Transport. they are still in existance today, although now based at Wembley.        Please click here to view their website.
The vehicle used was an ex Western Welsh AEC Bridgemaster, with Park Royal H41/27RD body. It was new in December 1958, registered PBO 685, and given Fleet Number 685.

 

Wallace School of Transport PBO 685

 

What led me to take my PSV Driving Test, and gain the coveted PSV Licence and Badge - well

I had begun my working career in 1968 with Oldham Corporation Passenger Transport Department, in the Works Office, but I had always wanted to be in the Traffic section.                            

(see my Oldham Corporation Transport Page),  

After a mamber of staff left, I was offered a job in the Traffic Office, and got involved in all aspects of Bus Operation. I felt that to know the job properly, I should obtain a PSV Driving Licence, so that I could know what life was like at the sharp end.

Of course this was an ambition which I had secretly had, since I was in short trousers, so was not a hard decision to make.

The first step on the ladder was to seek out the Chief Training Inspector - an ex Army Sargeant Major called Alec McAllistar, (Inspector Mac to everybody), he was not as frightening as his ex position may suggest.
I told him what my plans were, and why I was wanting to take the test.
He said that as far as he was concerned there was no problem, there was space in the Training School, and I could undertake training in the evenings and at weekends, so that it did not interfere with the day job.

Those were the days when Conductors who wished to become Drivers had to do the training in their own time, and unpaid, so the school operated at unsocial hours, which also allowed the Training vehicles to be used for peak hour service requirements.

The next step was to get permission off the Manager, so an official application form was completed and submitted the next morning, and I sat back and waited, for permission to start in the school.

The reply came 2 days later, but it was not the answer I was expecting.
As you have probably guessed it was NO. There were no vacancies in the school because it was so busy, and the Instructors could not be spared to teach me.

 

The memo showing the refusal can be seen here.

 

An appeal was made but to no avail, the answer was still NO.

So alternative plans had to be put in to motion.
I phoned around a number of HGV Driving Schools in the Oldham area, but they could not help, BSM even said there was no call for PSV tuition............ Strange as I was asking, and so must other prospective Bus and Coach Drivers.

It was about this time that I saw an article in Commercial Motor on PSV Driver Training Schools, one, Basford School of Transport Driving, was based in Nottingham, which was the nearest I had come to one in the whole of the North of England, never mind in Lancashire.
So a phone call was made and my intentions made known.
Once again I was out of luck, they were full to capacity, well in to the new Year (1972), their only bus, an AEC Regent lll being fully committed.
But they did give me the name and phone number of 'The Wallace School of Transport' also based in Nottingham.

So once again a phone call was made (this was beginning to get expensive on phone calls alone).
This time lady luck was on my side, - Yes, they had vacancies, and if I was available I could go to Nottingham on the following Sunday and undertake a 3 hour assessment drive (which cost £6 - more expense) to see how long it would take them to teach me, although it sounded like a 1 week course, of 40 hours' was the norm, to progress from car driver to Bus Driver.

Sunday dawned, and there was a covering of snow, this was to be present throughout just about all my training, but this was something I wanted to do more than anything else in the world (sad or what), so off I set.

Fortunately I had given myself plenty of time, to allow for getting lost trying to find the former railway goods yard in Nottingham (no Sat Nav then), and arrived shortly before my allotted time.
There standing in the middle of the yard was my bus, PBO 685, an AEC Bridgemaster, new in December 1958 to Western Welsh, (see picture at the top of this page).
Standing beside it was Bill Shepperson my Instructor for the assessment, and, already seated in the bus another victim - sorry - trainee.
If I thought I was going to jump into the driving seat straightaway I was much mistaken.
The assessment period comprised of three parts, firstly there was a brief talk about the responsibilty(s) of driving a PSV, secondly the test drive itself, and lastly a questionnaire on the Highway Code.
The brief talk completed I could now jump into the cab and away we would go, WRONG.
Bill climbed up into the cab and started to drive the bus out of the yard.
I suppose this was only sensible, the yard contained a number of HGVs, and the other PSV based at Nottingham, a Leyland Tiger single decker semi coach, the last thing that the Wallace School wanted was their business and lively hood wiped out in one fell swoop, by a novice trainee.
Bill drove to a quiet stretch of a dual carriageway, and pulled in to a layby, stopped the engine, climbed down and came round the back. He asked which one of use wanted to go first, so I said the other guy could go first. There was method in this, because I thought that I could possibly pick up a few tips, from his mistakes, and also as I said earlier it had been snowing, and the lower saloon had a nice big Calor Gas heater burning away.
This heater was fed from a gas bottle secured on the platform, a rubber hose running along the roof grab rail, down to the heater which was mounted on the front bulk head, (this heater would be in constant use during my period of training).
So, after an explaination of the controls from Bill, off we went.
I must say that the other guy hardly failed to put a foot wrong, so my thoughts of learning anything from him were quickly dashed, but I did stay warm. It turned out the other trainee was employed by Nottingham City Transport as a Conductor, had twice failed his test with them, and was now having to pay for his own lessons if he wanted to progress to be a Driver. After about half an hour Bill told him to pull over.

SO NOW IT WAS MY TURN.

I walked round to the front and climbed up into the cab, I was just about to slide the door shut when Bill climbed up.
This, he explained, was because I was a novice, and if need be, he could take action by either grabbing the steering wheel, or pulling on the hand brake, this instilled an aweful lot of confidence in me. 
During the normal course of instruction there was an emergancy air hand brake installed, for emergency situations, in the lower saloon just behind the drivers cab window, which of course, was missing, so that instructions and communications could be made between instructor and pupil.

So I started up the engine, selected first gear, gently squeezed the accelerator, let up the clutch until I could feel it bite, let off the hand brake, and moved slowly forward.
Sounds easy doesn't it, well it wasn't. The clutch was solid, and required a huge amount of effort to push down, and, more importantly let up again smoothly, the gear lever moved with all the ease of a spoon mixing concrete, and the hand brake needed all my strength to release. The steering was fairly heavy - even by 1972 standards - and the air brakes were super sensitive. Was I ever going to master it.

The modern day Bus Driver does not know he is born, what with - automatic gears, power steering, and spring parking brakes, (Oh, and don't forget cab heaters - I think you must realise by now that I don't like being cold), all he has to do is point the bus in the right direction, and use the soft and loud pedals (brake and accelerator) for stop and go. 
After about 5 minutes of driving Bill slid through the window back into the lower saloon, muttering something about not crashing it whilst he was doing it, and told me to carry on.

After the 30 minutes driving time was up (what happened to the 3 hours?), Bill directed me back to the yard, and must have thought I would not write off the 'fleet', let me drive back into the yard.
Hand brake on, out of gear, turn the engine off, but how did I do that.
This bit of the exercise was Bills' party trick. 
Now, I had seen in to the cabs of Leylands, and seen Drivers pull the engine stop situated to their left coming out of the engine compartment bulkhead, so I reached down, but no knob. So I searched and searched, but to no avail, of course I had to give in and ask, and Bill with a twinkle in his eye let me into the secret. On AECs the engine stop was situated on the accelerator, and by pulling it back the engine would stop. This valuable lesson learnt, the training finished.

Now came the moment of truth, how many hours/days/weeks, or even months would I need to become a Bus Driver.

Well Bill told me that I would need a week's joint tuition, which would consist of 5 full days training, with another trainee, followed by the PSV Driving Test, which would take place possibly on the last day depending on test availablity.
Before that I would have to fill in all the PSV Licence Application forms, and send them off to the Traffic Area office (along with the relevant fees) and have a medical.

I can not remember what the test fee was , but I do remember that the Licence fee was 3/- (15p in new money) for a 3 year licence, AND 2/6 (12½p in new money) PSV Badge Deposit. This was returnable when your licence expired and you sent your badge back to the Traffic Area office.
For those of you who are interested, I will cover the intricacies of the PSV licensing, and the Traffic Area system at a later time.
So the day was over and I drove home, knowing that (hopefully) it would not be long before I was back in Nottingham, and the Wallace School of Transport would be teaching me to Drive a Bus.

On getting into work on the Monday morning I checked up to see how many days holiday I had left, and found that I only had 4 days left. This was a problem because I wanted to start my training as soon as possible, and to have 5 days holiday I would have to wait until April and the start of the new leave year.
It was now getting into December and it would be a whole 3 months before April arrived. So I phoned the Wallace School and asked if it would be possible to have a course of individual training, rather than the joint course as suggested.

For once I was lucky, they said they had a slot starting on 20th January, which would be 3 days tuition, followed by the test on the morning of Thursday 23rd January 1972 - a day to remembered. So I booked it.
In the mean time I had to complete all the paperwork for the Traffic Area office, and have a medical.

 

 

TO BE CONTINUED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/learning-to-drive-a-bus Sat, 24 Feb 2018 14:27:43 GMT
MY BEGINNINGS IN TRANSPORT http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/my-beginnings-in-transport MY BEGINNINGS IN TRANSPORT 

 

In April 2011, I elected to take Early Retirement from my post with Durham County Council having completed over 43 years in the Passenger Transport Industry, and thought it was about time to put down in writing, my experiences, before I forget them.                                                                                                                        
I am sure those of you who stumble across this site will quickly go back one page and find something more interesting to look at.
In 1968 I was finishing my studies at College in Manchester, Brooks Bar to be precise, (an area of Manchester which I will make acquaintance with later on in my career), when an Aunt of mine showed me an advert in the Oldham Evening Chronicle for the position of a Junior Works Clerk with Oldham Corporation Passenger Transport Department.
Having always had a passing interest in Transport of all kinds I thought that it would be a good steady job, with good prospects. 
(Well it was until a certain Nicholls Ridley came along).
So I wrote an Application Letter, (no such things as a C.V., in those days), and waited for a reply.
This arrived a few days later when a car pulled up at our house and a gentleman got out and handed me a letter. 

I later learned that he was the Insurance and Licensing Officer who lived in the same village as me.


The letter inviting me for interview. 

Click here to see a larger size.

For those of you who have stayed with this until now, you would probably like to know the name of the village. It was (and still is for that matter) called DELPH.
                                                                                 

Postcard view of King Street Delph


Delph is situated in the foothills of the Pennines, roughly half way between Manchester and Huddersfield on the A62, and was in The Urban District of Saddleworth, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, until moved into Greater Manchester in the 1974 Local Government re-organization.
There was much protesting, petition writing and public meetings to stay in the West Riding but all to no avail, it was moved.
Saddleworth is of course unfortunately more well known for the Moors murders, committed by Ian Brady and Myra Hindley, but I will not go there.
Delph is also famous for being the home - for a number of years - of another famous transport figure, that of Geoffrey Hilditch. 

For those of you who have not read his books 'Steel Wheels and Rubber Tyres' (Volumes 1 & 2) I can thoroughly recommend them. 

In recent years King Street, as shown in the postcard above, was used as the setting for the film 'Brassed Off', 
where the band marched down the street to play at the Annual Whit Friday Band Contest. A clip of the film is shown below

 

​<div style="position:relative;height:0;padding-bottom:66.02%"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5uQcDXZ9WVQ?ecver=2" style="position:absolute;width:100%;height:100%;left:0" width="545" height="360" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe></div>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now back to the story. The letter invited me for interview at the Wallshaw Street Offices on the following Saturday morning - these were the days of 5 1/2 and 6 day weeks - with the Chief Clerk Mr. E. J. Healey.
So, the next Saturday, with shoes polished and trousers pressed I caught the bus from Delph Station to Oldham Mumps Bridge, (a journey I was going to make many times over the next few years), and made the short walk to Wallshaw Street Depot, and, as requested in the letter reported to the Garage Warden (what a grand title) who escorted me to the offices.
Here I was greeted by Mr Healey, and the interview commenced. Well 42 years is a long time, and I do not remember anything of the interview, except that at the end of it I was offered the post, and could start a week the following Monday on 27th May 1968.
The job which I had been lucky enough to get was as Junior Works Clerk in the Works Office, which was situated in the old Tram Depot.
So started 5 very happy years at Oldham Corporation Passenger Transport Department (later to become SELNEC PTE - Oldham District).

 

Above is an extract from the Annual Report of the General Manager for the Year ending 31st March 1969, which confirms my Appointment.

 

 

 

 




                                                   Aerial View of Wallshaw Street Depot (click on image to enlarge view).

The Oldham Corporation Depot was split into 2 sections separated by Car Street.
The 1st section that you came to was the old Tram shed. This Depot was originally opened in 1902, and offices were included in the original building, but were rebuilt in 1934 to the layout that I was to work in.
 
Click here to see a plan of the Offices as I remember them in 1968
 
Trams were to operate out of this building until final abandonment of the system, on Saturday 3rd August 1946, and in 1952 modifications were carried out to make the workshops suitable to maintain the modern buses of the day.

(See Last Days of Oldhams Trams Page)

The 2nd section was the Garage, (which is still in use by First Group), was opened on 23rd May 1938, by Alderman J. Crabtree the chairman of the Transport Committee (formally the Tramways Committee). The new Garage and the old Tram Depot, were at the centre of the Undertaking's operating area at the junction of Wallshaw Street, and the afore mentioned Car Street, and was built with a view to minimising dead mileage and reducing working expenses, and, at that time was the most modern motorbus garage in the country, and was a show piece, and was visited by officials from other Municipal Undertakings.
It was , and still is a remarkably fine building with a floor of 390ft by 350ft, giving a floor area of 136,500ft, and a main entrance, 54ft wide. The Garage roof has only 3 stanchions, supporting girders with spans of over 200ft.
It was built to accommodate 300 buses, (when I started it had approx 250), but as buses have got bigger, both longer and wider, plus bendibuses, this figure will now be much reduced.


The offices were entered up three steps at the top of which were a pair of double doors, in which were embossed glass panels on which were the Corporation Coat of Arms, and to the right of which was a brass plaque which proclaimed:-

                        'OLDHAM CORPORATION PASSENGER TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT' - HEAD OFFICES.

 

 

The doors opened up into the Enquiry and Lost Property Office which was all wood panelled, with a small enquiry window to the left, (I was to find out more of what went on in this office as time went on). This was the first time I had entered this imposing building by the main entrance, on the day of my interview I had gone in by a side door, because the Enquiry Office was shut on Saturdays. I reported for work by ringing the bell.
The window was opened by a very pleasant lady who I later found out was called Rene Trigg, (her husband was an Inspector, keeping up a tradition of families working on the buses).I was taken up to the first floor offices in an antiquated lift which had mesh doors on both sides. You entered in to the lift and then got out on the opposite side. I was shown where the Time clock was, because even office staff had to clock on and off, and taken to Mr Healeys' office, where, the official form filling took place, National Insurance Cards handed over, and more importantly I was given my FREE Bus Pass.
The world was now my oyster, or at least that part of it which Oldham Corporation ran in. The pass only allowed free travel on Oldham Corporation buses, if you caught a Manchester Corporation, or a North Western Road Car Company vehicle you had to pay.
This was a bit of a bind because living where I did (Delph if you had forgotten), was also served by both those two concerns, so I had to make sure that I caught an Oldham bus to get the benefit.
After all the formalities were completed, I was taken down to the Works Office. This was another trip in the lift, back down to the enquiry area.
The offices attached to the works were accessed through the Enquiry Office.


 
The Works Offices with the Electrical Shop below. The Works Office is above far left. (Click on the image to enlarge)

These had been built as a mezzanine floor above the workshops, with the Foremans Office, Electricians shop, and Fuel injection/Fuel pump test area below.  A veranda walkway looked out over the works, with the offices situated to the left with the windows looking out on to Car Street.
The first office you came to was the Bonus Clerks office, staffed by Jack Bolton, and Jean Probert, and - from Nov 1968 - Mo Baynham.
There were then, on the left a set of stairs leading down in to the works. The next office was the Work Study Engineers Office (with David Ward, Derek Wigett, Ivan Adams, and others whose names I can no longer remember). This was an expanding function, with all jobs in the works shops and Garage being studied, and given a time to complete the task, so that a Bonus could be paid.
The next office was the Works Office where I was to work. Next door was the drawing office, then the Assistant Engineers Office (Mr Eric Watts), later to work at Portsmouth Passenger Transport Department, then the Holy of Holies ‘The Chief Engineers’ office (Mr Eric Jenkins), later to become Chief Engineer for West Midlands PTE.
Mr Healey took me to see Mr Jenkins to be introduced, and then to the Works Office where I was introduced to the people I would be working with.
These were John Jenkins, Senior Works Clerk, Jeff Yates, Works Clerk, and Stella (her last name escapes me) who was the Shorthand Typist. These were the people I was to work with for the next 2 years or so, before I moved in to the Traffic Office.
So the first thing was to be given my desk, not difficult as it was the only one vacant.
I had my back to the workshops, but had a good view in to Car Street, and the imposing entrance to the Pennine Suite, which was the magnificent Ball Room, and recreation club of the  “Oldham Corporation Passenger Transport Department Social Club”.

 

                                                       The Entrance to the Pennine Lounge mentioned in the text.

 

​to be continued

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stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/my-beginnings-in-transport Wed, 21 Feb 2018 17:34:18 GMT
MY EARLIEST RECOLLECTIONS http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/my-earliest-recollections MY EARLIEST RECOLLECTIONS
 

My earliest recollections of buses - unlike some people, who could tell the difference between a PD2 and an AEC Regent at 2 miles, (and from their pram) - was from about the age of 6, which would make it the mid 1950s.

We lived in an area of the West Riding of Yorkshire called Saddleworth, in the Village of Greenfield.
Whilst Saddleworth was in Yorkshire,  our nearest Town was Oldham, and the nearest City was Manchester, both of which were firmly in Lancashire.

The area was served by 4 main operators, these being:-
Oldham Corporation Passenger Transport Department (OCPTD),
Manchester Corporation Transport Department (MCTD),
North Western Road Car Co Ltd (NWRCC), and
Stalybridge, Hyde, Mossley and Dukinfield Joint Transport and Electricity Board (SHMD).
There were also Express Services operated by the Tyne Tees/Mersey Pool, which produced a variety of operators, the others being operated by NWRCC.

Another interesting service was that operated by Hanson Buses, from Huddersfield to Oldham. I seem to remember that they had rather an interesting fleet of AECs, some of which were re-builds.

We lived in an area of Greenfield called Dacres, and the bus route which went past, was the 154, a joint operation between SHMD and NWRCC. The route ran between Ashton-under-Lyne (St Michael’s Square) and Uppermill (Commercial Hotel) via Mossley Station and Greenfield.

If journeys further afield were required a change had to be made at Greenfield (Clarence Hotel) on to the Service 10 for Oldham and Manchester. Or at Uppermill for services for other Saddleworth villages, such as Denshaw, Diggle, Dobcross, and (the village where I would later live) Delph.

Uppermill Square in the mid 1960s. Note the old Cinema in the right distance - which at that time was Central Garage, owned by Miles Bottomley who lived at 7 Dacres Avenue, we lived at No2. 

I bought many a car from here, the last being a Ford Escort - UVH 19R.

Buses on the 154 service used to pull on to the car park of the Commercial Hotel on the right and then reverse in to the side street to wait departure time.

Only single deckers could be used on the 154 service because of a Low Bridge at Black Rock between Stalybridge and Mossley, which carried the Stalybridge to Huddersfield railway line.

This line ran through the Standedge Tunnel from Diggle to Marsden.
For those of you interested in railways Standedge Tunnel was opened in 1894 by the London and North Western Railway with a double track and a length of 3 miles 60 yards (4806m). The tunnel is the 3rd longest in Britain, after the Severn Tunnel, and the Sheffield to Manchester route’s Totley Tunnel.

The SHMD operated a combination of Daimler and Atkinson single deckers on the 154.

I remember the rear entrance Daimler CVD6s (MMA56-60 Fleet Nos.56-60) new in 1950, with Northern Counties bodies, (the SHMD standard bodybuilder from 1950 until their last new deliveries in 1967, before SELNEC took over), because they had leather bell pulls in the overhead grab rails – like London Transport. 

It was always the highlight of any journey if I could ring the bell by this method.
Another memory of these buses was the lovely engine sound they gave. It still lingers in my memory today.

As an aside, (of which there will be many as we go through this journey) I remember the crews of SHMD, always seemed to wear the full uniform of Blue serge with green piping around the tunic collar, and down the trouser leg. Uniform caps, with the SHMD logo badge, were always worn, with white cap covers in the summer.     

VERY SMART.

Not like today’s Corporate designs, AND always worn with a yellow fluorescent HiViz waistcoat, (why do they bother with the uniform - just give them the yellow jacket instead).


1953 saw the arrival of a Daimler G6H with B34C bodywork (Reg No. PLG 967, Fleet No 67), and in 1954, 2 similar bodied Atkinson PL746Hs arrived (SMA 868-869, Fleet Nos. 68/69), with 2 more in 1956 (XLG 477-478 Fleet Nos. 77/78).
All these vehicles regularly appeared on the 154, the centre entrance with large standee areas being of particular interest, because there was a front nearside seat beside the Driver, which allowed great views of what this illustrious gentleman was doing, the views of the road being of little interest.
67 was particularly interesting, because it had a pre-selector gearbox. I could never work out how the driver changed gear long after he had moved the gear lever. Something I was to find out about 17 years later.
More Atkinson’s arrived in 1959, (993-995 GMA Fleet Nos. 93-95), but this time with B34F bodies, with single seats at the front of the saloon to get the high standing capacity achieved on the centre entrance type.

NORTH WESTERN ROAD CAR COMPANY LIMITED 

North Western Road Car Companies earliest contribution, which I remember were, the Bristol L5Gs with Weymann bodies, from the 1950 delivery.  They had rear entrance bodies, with a Conductor operated door, and a big chrome heater on the front bulkhead.

I seem to remember that they were rather finely upholstered, with deep seat cushions (or was this because I was young and small). Of course my favourite seat was the one right at the front behind the Driver.
Later additions to the fleet in 1954/55 saw Leyland Cubs, again with Weymann bodies, allocated to the service, along with AEC Reliance’s with both Willowbrook and Alexander (my personal favourite) dual purpose bodies. 
Little did I then realize that I would drive some of these very vehicles, when they were transferred to SELNEC.
Oldham Depot was later allocated the whole delivery of a batch of Albion Aberdonians (714-719), in 1957, which only lasted 10 years before withdrawal.
These were used mainly as OMO buses, and so did not stray onto the 154 often, as Crew operation still existed.
Of course with NWRCC being such a big organization, vehicles moved around the Depots, so it was not unusual for any single deck vehicle type to be used, on the 154.
In 1962 my Father died, and it was decided that we would move from Dacres, back to the village of Delph where my Mothers family lived, and where she had been born.
Delph was mainly served by buses from NWRCC, but OCPTD, and MCTD operated from Delph Station to Oldham and Manchester on the 13/14 services, and the 153/155 Uppermill Circular.

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stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/my-earliest-recollections Wed, 21 Feb 2018 17:23:40 GMT
HISTORY OF OLDHAM CORPORATION TRANSPORT HISTORY 1900 - 1969 http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/history-of-oldham-corporation-transport-fleet-history-1900---1969 Oldham Corporation Transport

1900-1969

 

Oldham's first tramway, authorised by the Oldham Borough Tramways Order of 1878, was officially opened on the 16th September 1880. Although the Corporation had laid the infrastructure, the initial lease of the system was to the Manchester Carriage and Tramways company, whose horse trams ran from Waterhead along Huddersfield Road to the Manchester boundary at Hollinwood.
In 1885 the Manchester, Bury, Rochdale and Oldham Steam Tramway Company (MBRO), opened a line into the town via Royton, with a branch line to Werneth station opening in 1889. Another private company with an interest in Oldham was the Oldham, Ashton and Hyde Electric Tramways Company Ltd., a subsidiary of the British Electric Traction Company, whose line to the Oldham boundary at Hathershaw, from the Market Place at Ashton-under-Lyne, opened in 1899. Trams did not however run through until the lease expired and was purchased by the local authorities in 1921.

The first line to be operated by the Corporation, under the Oldham Corporation Act of 1899, opened on the 15th December 1900, and was from the boundary at Chadderton along Middleton Road to Rochdale Road where it connected with the MBRO line. At this time, Oldham was still being served by the horse trams of the Manchester Carriage and Tramways Company and the steam trams of the MBRO and the addition of the Corporation's own electric trams added to the patchwork of services. In 1901, however, the lease on the horse tram system expired and Oldham Corporation took over the working of the lines. At the same time the Corporation came to an agreement with the MBRO for the purchase of their lines and set to work unifying and electrifying the whole system.

The Middleton Electric Traction Company, another BET subsidiary, commenced operations on a small section of line between Chadderton, at the Oldham boundary, and Rhodes, via Mills Hill and Middleton town centre, in 1902. The system was sold in 1925 to the participating local authorities and integrated with the Manchester Corporation system in Middleton, allowing through running from Oldham.

In the meantime Oldham Corporation had set about upgrading and expanding the lines within the borough and by 1903 operated a network of services, summarised below;

Waterhead - Hollinwood

Hollinwood - Watersheddings

Lees (County End) - Werneth (Fire Station)

Higginshaw - Union Street

Werneth (Fire Station) - Boundary Park

Chadderton boundary (Middleton Rd) - Wellington Street

Hathershaw - Boundary Park

Market Place - Moorside

Union Street,Glodwick Road,Park Road,Star Inn Circular

Higginshaw - Rock Street

Chadderton Rd - Market Place

Further developments took place until 1925 when the line from the Chadderton boundary was extended through to Middleton, following the purchase of that portion of the line from Middleton Corporation (who had themselves acquired the section from the Middleton Electric Traction Co Ltd). This proved to be the last extension of the tramway system.

Motorbuses had made an appearance in Oldham during May 1913, when two Tilling-Stevens TTA2 petrol-electric vehicles (BU401-2) were purchased for two routes. The first commenced at the Town Hall and ran to the Coppice, a distance of just under a mile. The second was from the Moorside tram terminus to Grains Bar and was intended as a stop-gap measure until the opening of the new tram terminus there. It ran until June 1914. A third Tilling-Stevens was acquired to provide cover and was registered BU11, following the then common practice of re-issuing void registration marks for new vehicles.

A further service was introduced on the 31st August 1914 to Denshaw from the new tram terminus at Grains Bar. However, the cost of operating the buses was becoming too expensive and the services were withdrawn in 1919. No attempt was made to re-introduce buses until 1924, when several private companies began services which competed against the Corporation's tramway network. Initially, it was intended to operate buses as feeder's to the tram service and five new all-Leyland C9 single-deckers with forward entrance, which made them capable of one-man operation, were purchased. The new service started on the 15th December 1924, connecting Mumps and Hollinwood railway stations. On the 28th February 1925 a second service commenced from Chadderton Road to the Broadway, New Moston, extended on 25th July 1925 to serve Royton station and terminating at the New Moston boundary with Manchester. To cope with the extensions four all-Leyland C7's were purchased. It was at this time that Oldham Corporation commenced lettering their bus routes to avoid confusion with the regularly numbered tram routes, a practice that was to continue, except on jointly operated routes, which were numbered.

When, in 1925, Ashton Corporation decided to replace the trams on its share of the Oldham to Ashton service with trolleybuses, it requested that Oldham Corporation do the same. As a result two Short-bodied Railless trolleybuses were acquired, Oldham's share of a combined order for ten, and the joint service began on 26th August 1925. In the event the trolleybuses were to last just over a year before being replaced by motorbuses, although Ashton continued to run them on its section of the route.

On the 10th October 1926 a new depot was opened in Henshaw Street to accommodate the growing fleet of buses.

In the latter part of the decade it became increasingly expensive to run the tram system, mainly due to the increasing costs of track maintenance and replacement and some of the tram routes were superseded by buses. On 1st May 1928 the last tram ran to Lees, and on 24th December 1928 the Market Place to Grains Bar section was abandoned. Wholesale abandonment of the tramway system, however, was not begun until 1934 and subsequently delayed by the Second World War, so that the last tram did not run until the 3rd August 1946.

In preparation for the tramway replacement, however, the Corporation had been evaluating chassis types and come down in favour of Leyland. As a result over 160 Leyland TD4 and TD5 chassis were purchased in the next decade or so, carrying a variety of body styles. By 1931 the livery was crimson and lake, replacing the earlier dark blue and white introduced on the first motorbuses in 1924, and remained so until 1966 when it was altered to pommard and cream. Buses replaced the trams on the Market Place to Hollinwood section in 1935 and in 1937 the Circular route was turned over to motorbuses. At the same time there had been a rise in the volume of passenger traffic and as a result more buses were required. This resulted in an order for 30 new buses in 1937, which included six Daimler COG6 chassis with Gardner 6LW engines, the only such engines to grace the Oldham Corporation fleet. The pre-war delivery of so many new buses meant that Oldham, unlike most other operators, did not have to resort to an intake of utility buses during hostilities and when peace broke out, Oldham Corporation's fleet was still relatively young. Buses replaced the final remaining tram route, to Manchester from Waterhead, on the 3rd August 1946, and an effort to restore services to pre-war levels began.

A change in ordering policy in the early pre-war years saw a number of Crossley and Daimler vehicles, as well as Leyland, purchased, and, with the fleet renewed, there followed a period of stabilisation. By 1952 the fleet strength stood at 240 vehicles, of which only 14 were single-deck. 
Housing developments necessitated the introduction of new services to Fitton Hill and Holts estates in the mid-fifties and, with running costs rising, Oldham Corporation decided to accept bus advertising; the first such advert appeared in November 1953. As was the case with many operators at this time, Oldham Corporation found themselves with a serious staff shortage and this did little to improve the running of the services.

In 1956 the maximum length for double-deckers was increased to 30ft, but, although an AEC Bridgemaster demonstrator (116TMD) was on hire during 1959, it was not until 1964 that Oldham Corporation purchased 30ft long vehicles. Several other vehicles were hired from neighbouring authorities for assessment before ten Leyland PD3/5's with Roe H41/32F bodywork were finally purchased in 1964.

Spare parts for some of the postwar buses were becoming difficult to obtain and supplies of Crossley components had been discontinued, so Oldham acquired several withdrawn vehicles (including 2 ex-Liverpool Crossley DD42/7's, 6 ex-Birmingham Daimler CVD6's and 2 ex-Bury Leyland PD1's) for cannibalisation.
In 1965 the first rear-engined buses, ten Leyland PDR1/1 Atlanteans were put into service. Later that year Oldham Corporation suffered a major setback when an inspection by the Ministry of Transport examiners found faults on 97 buses, resulting in the Corporation urgently hiring 45 buses from neighbouring authorities. Subsequently it was decided to purchase several second-hand vehicles to bolster the fleet.

On the 1st April 1968 the practice of allocating letters as route identification was replaced by route numbering.

The 1968 Road Transport Act provided for the creation of the South East Lancashire and North East Cheshire (SELNEC) Passenger Transport Executive, of which Oldham became a part on the 1st November 1969, officially ceasing to exist as a separate municipal undertaking at midnight on the 31st October.

]]>
stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/history-of-oldham-corporation-transport-fleet-history-1900---1969 Wed, 21 Feb 2018 17:15:34 GMT
OLDHAM CORPORATION TRAM FLEET LIST 1900 - 1946 http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/oldham-corporation-tram-fleet-list-1900---1946 Oldham Corporation Transport

Tram Fleet List
1900-1946

 

Fleet No.

Type

Trucks

Body

Seating

1900

1

Single-deck
saloon
4-wheel

Brill 21E

ERTCW

28

2

Double-deck
open-top
4-wheel

Brill 21E

ERTCW

34/22

3

Double-deck
open-top
bogie

Brill 22E

ERTCW

42/26

4

Single-deck
saloon
bogie

Brill 27G

ERTCW

36

Nos. 1-4 purchased for evaluation in November 1900.
No. 1 also quoted as seating 30.
No. 2 fitted with balcony top-cover by 1920.
No. 4 also quoted as seating 38.
Withdrawn by 1915 (3), 1916 (4), 1928 (1), 1936 (2).

1902

5-16

Single-deck
saloon
bogie

Brill 27G

ERTCW

38

17-26

Single-deck
saloon
4-wheel

Brill 21E

ERTCW

30

27-80

Double-deck
open-top
4-wheel

Brill 21E

ERTCW

28/20

No. 13 converted to top-covered double-deck (40/32) in 1903.
Nos. 27-80 delivered between 5th December 1901 and June 1903; most were fitted with top-covers by 1922 (except Nos. 43, 47, 50, 52, 55-57, 68, 70, 74, 80, which remained open-top); seating increased to 30/20 (Nos. 13, 27-36, 58, 70, 76), or 36/20 (63, 77-78), the seating of other cars is uncertain except those mentioned below.
Nos. 43, 47, 56-57, 74 had top-decks extended increasing seating capacity to 40/20 by 1926; Nos. 43, 47 converted to single-deck in 1933 (43) or 1935 (47) with seating capacity of 26 and 25 respectively.
No. 34 rebuilt to open balcony and re-seated to 32/20 in 1922.
No. 38 rebuilt and re-numbered 93 in 1912 after accident.
Nos. 40, 54 rebuilt totally enclosed and re-seated to 36/20 in 1921
No. 45 rebuilt to open balcony and re-seated to 32/20 in 1921.
No. 49 rebuilt totally enclosed and re-seated to 36/20 in 1922.
Withdrawn by 1916 (5-12, 15-16), 1918 (17-18, 20, 24), 1923 (27), by 1924 (13, 19, 22), 1926 (23, 26, 32), 1927 (21, 28, 52), 1929 (25), by 1930 (35, 37, 38[93], 39, 42, 50-51, 55, 58-59, 61-62, 64, 67-68, 70-71, 76-77, 80), 1937 (44, 46, 48, 60, 63, 65-66, 69, 72-73, 79), 1939 (29-31, 34, 40-41, 45, 49, 53-54, 75, 78).

1911

81-92

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Preston Flexible

UEC

36/22

Withdrawn 1937 (81-92).

1913

94-99

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Preston Flexible

UEC

36/22

Withdrawn 1936 (99), 1937 (94-98).

1914

100-111

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Preston Flexible

UEC

36/22

Withdrawn 1937 (100-111).

1920

4-12

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Brill 21E

English Electric

36/22

14-16

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Brill 21E

English Electric

36/22

112

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Brill 21E

Oldham Corporation

36/22

No. 112 was constructed using the body from No. 3 of 1900, which had been out of service (although used as a platelayers hut) since 1915.
Withdrawn 1939 (7, 112), 1946 (4-6, 8-12, 14-16).

1924

17-20

Double-deck
fully-enclosed
4-wheel

Brill 21E

English Electric

42/22

22

Double-deck
fully-enclosed
4-wheel

Brill 21E

English Electric

42/22

24

Double-deck
fully-enclosed
4-wheel

Brill 21E

English Electric

42/22

Withdrawn 1939 (19-20), 1946 (17-18, 22, 24).

1925

113-120

Single-deck
saloon
4-wheel

Peckham
or
Brush AA

Brush

26

Nos. 113-120 ex-Middleton Electric Traction Co. (Nos. 27-34); re-trucked with Brill 21E by Oldham Corporation at a later date.
Withdrawn 1933 (119), 1934 (117), 1935 (113-116, 118, 120).

1926

121-132

Double-deck
fully-enclosed
4-wheel

Brill 21E

English Electric

42/22

Withdrawn 1946 (121-132).

]]>
stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/oldham-corporation-tram-fleet-list-1900---1946 Wed, 21 Feb 2018 16:55:05 GMT
DERBY CORPORATION TRANSPORT BUS FLEET LIST 1968 - 1986 http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/derby-corporation-transport-bus-fleet-list-1968---1986 Derby Corporation Transport

Bus Fleet List
1968 - 1986

Fleet No.

Reg. No.

Chassis

Chassis No.

Body

Seating

 

1968

205-219

UCH205-19G

Daimler CRG6LX

62711-25

Roe

H44/34F

Withdrawn 1981 (205, 208-209, 213, 215-216, 218), 1982 (206-207, 210-212, 214, 217, 219).

1969

220-239

XCH420-39G

Daimler CRG6LX

63551-70

Roe

H44/34F

Withdrawn 1981 (220, 222-224, 229, 232, 235), 1982 (221, 226, 231, 234, 236-239), 1983 (228), 1984 (225, 227, 230, 233).

1970

240-254

CRC240-54J

Daimler CRG6LX

64034-48

Roe

H45/29D

Withdrawn 1978 (250, 253-254), 1984 (240-249, 252-252).

1972

255-259

OCH255-59L

Daimler SRC6LX/33

64771-75

Willowbrook

DP43F

Withdrawn 1979 (255-259).

1973

17

ORA819M

Bedford YRT

CW454751

Duple

C53F

18

ORA818M

Bedford YRT

CW454725

Duple

C53F

19-20

SCH19-20L

Bedford YRQ

CW453020/
143

Willowbrook

C45F

23

7000HP

Daimler CRD6

60000

Weymann

H44/33F

24-25

324-325YNU

Daimler CRG6LX

60003/54

Northern Counties

H40/33F

26

ARA762B

Daimler CRG6LX

60603

Northern Counties

H40/33F

27

JRB481D

Daimler CRG6LX

61216

Northern Counties

H41/31F

28

NRA49J

Daimler CRG6LX

64410

Alexander

H44/31F

30

SRB425

Daimler CD650

18333

Willowbrook

L27/28RD

31

YRB483

Daimler CVG6

18880

Willowbrook

L27/28RD

32

465FRB

Dennis Loline I

135Y1

Willowbrook

H37/33RD

33

303GRB

Dennis Loline I

136Y1

Willowbrook

H37/33RD

34

702PRA

Daimler CVG6

19491

Willowbrook

L27/28RD

35

YRB203G

Bedford VAL70

7T460118

Willowbrook

DP56F

36

BRB674G

Bedford VAL70

7T459067

Willowbrook

DP54F

37

CRA882B

Bedford SB5

96296

Duple

C41F

38

KRB426D

Bedford VAL14

6827558

Duple

C52F

39

NRA680D

Bedford VAM14

6865626

Duple

C45F

40

TNU687F

Daimler SRC6

36024

Plaxton

C51F

41

FRA631H

Bedford SB5

9T470648

Duple

C41F

42

ORB883K

Bedford SB5

1T485152

Duple

C41F

43

DXE137J

Bedford YRQ

1T482715

Willowbrook

B45F

44

EXE276J

Bedford YRQ

0T481598

Willowbrook

DP45F

260-271

OCH260-71L

Daimler CRG6LX

66579-90

Roe

H44/34F

Nos. 17-18, 23, 24-28, 30-44 ex-Blue Bus Service, Willington (new 1973 (17), 1973 (18), 1960 (23), 1962 (24), 1962 (25), 1964 (26), 1966 (27), 1971 (28), 1953 (30) 1955 (31), 1957 (32), 1958 (33), 1960 (34), 1968 (35), 1969 (36), 1964 (37), 1966 (38), 1966 (39), 1967 (40), 1970 (41), 1971 (42), 1971 (43), 1971 (44).
Nos. 260-261, 270-271 to Derby City Transport Ltd.10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.
Withdrawn 1974 (30), 1975 (33, 35-37, 43), 1976 (17-20, 23-28, 34, 38-42, 44), 1977 (31-32), 1985 (262-269).

1975

15

HTO90N

Leyland PSU3B/4R

7500020

Plaxton

C47F

16

HTO91N

Leyland PSU3B/4R

7500021

Plaxton

C51F

Withdrawn 1976 (15-16).

1976

9

NNN9P

AEC Reliance

6U2R33487

Plaxton

C47F

10-11

NNN10-11P

AEC Reliance

6U2R33428/
40

Plaxton

C51F

12-13

NNN12-13P

AEC Reliance

6U2R33489/
97

Plaxton

C53F

21-22

FDK419-20D

AEC Reliance

2U3RA6441-42

Plaxton

C45F

51-53

NAL51-53P

Leyland FE30AGR

7505628/
7600000/02

Alexander

H44/34F

58

YJA20

Daimler CRG6LX

60525

Alexander

H44/31F

61

UBX48

Leyland PDR1/1

591470

Weymann

L39/34F

62

WTH113

Leyland PDR1/1

602290

Weymann

L39/34F

63

RTH639

Leyland PDR1/1

590061

MCCW

L39/34F

272-278

NNN272-78P

Leyland FE30AGR

7505629-30/
912/36-37/
7600001/03

Roe

H43/30F

279-288

RCH279-88R

Leyland FE30AGR

7603922-23/
45-46/66/
4287-89/
308-09

Roe

H43/30F

Nos. 21-22 ex-Yelloway MS, Rochdale (new 1966).
No. 58 ex-Greater Manchester PTE (No. 20, new 1963).
Nos. 61-63 ex-City of Oxford MS (Nos. 204, 206, 212 respectively, new 1959 or 1960 (WTH113)).
Nos. 9-12, 51-53, 272-288 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.
Withdrawn 1978 (21-22, 61), 1979 (62), 1982 (58, 63), 1984 (13).

1977

71

RTO71R

Ailsa B55/20

75190

Alexander

H43/34F

No. 71 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet number.

1978

27-28

DED977-78L

Leyland PSU3B/4R

7300341/44

Plaxton

C49F

50

XRR50S

Leyland FE30AGR

7704493

Northern Counties

H43/29F

101

WTO101S

Foden-NCME

95420

Northern Counties

H43/30F

289-298

XRR289-98S

Leyland FE30AGR

7703942-43/
71-72/97/
4110/301-02/
87/490

Northern Counties

H43/30F

Nos. 27-28 ex-Warrington CT (Nos. 3-4 respectively, new 1973).
Nos. 50, 289-298 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.
Withdrawn 1982 (27-28), 1985 (101).

1979

1

DVO1T

Volvo B58-56

13742

Plaxton

C53F

23

PDK463H

AEC Reliance

6U3ZR7309

Plaxton

C45F

253-255

MLK440-442L

Daimler CRG6LXB

66453/86-87

Park Royal

H44/27F

No. 1 re-seated to C49F in 1979; re-seated back to C53F in 1983.
No. 23 ex-Yelloway MS, Rochdale (new 1970).
Nos. 253-255 ex-London Transport (Nos. DMS440-442 respectively, new 1972 as H44/24D; converted to H44/27F before purchase).
Nos. 1, 253-254 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.
Withdrawn 1982 (23), 1984 (255).

1980

2

JRB2V

Leyland PSU3F/5R

7904848

Plaxton

C53F

45-48

GTO45-48V

Leyland FE30AGR

7802650/730/
3363/495-96

Northern Counties

H43/29F

102

GRA102V

MCW Metrobus DR102/4

MB5052

MCW

H43/30F

103-105

GTO103-05V

Dennis Dominator

DDA120/205-07

Marshall

H45/32F

250

JGU283K

Daimler CRG6LXB

66400

MCW

H44/27F

256

MLK463L

Daimler CRG6LXB

66489

Park Royal

H44/27F

257-259

MLK465-67L

Daimler CRG6LXB

66516/19/21

Park Royal

H44/27F

299-308

GTO299-308V

Leyland FE30AGR

7803498-99/
808-09/25-26/
92/3928/
4030-31

Northern Counties

H43/30F

309-311

MTV309-11W

Leyland FE30AGR

7900031-32/
134

Northern Counties

H43/30F

Nos. 250, 256, 257-259 ex-London Transport (Nos. DMS1283, 463, 465-467 respectively, new 1972 as H44/24D; converted to H44/27F before purchase).
Nos. 2, 45-48, 250, 256-259, 299-311 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.
Withdrawn 1982 (102), 1986 (103-105).

1981

100

LUG480P

Ailsa B55-10

74010

Alexander

H44/35F

106-108

NRR106-08W

Dennis Dominator

DDA120/270-72

Northern Counties

H43/30F

312-315

MTV312-15W

Leyland FE30AGR

7900135-36/
244-45

Northern Counties

H43/30F

Nos. 100, 312-315 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same numbers.
Withdrawn 1986 (106-108).

1982

3

VRA3Y

Leyland TRCTL11/3

?

Plaxton

C50F

109-115

SRC109-15X

Ailsa B55-10

80041-43/
45-46/53-54

Northern Counties

H39/35F

116-121

TCH116-21X

Ailsa B55-10

81188-93

Northern Counties

H38/35F

122-123

STV122-23X

Ailsa B55-10

80049-50

Marshall

H44/35F

124-125

VRA124-25Y

Leyland Olympian

ON80-81

Northern Counties

H43/28F

Nos. 3, 109-123 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.
Nos. 124-125 re-numbered 204-205 in 1984.
Withdrawn 1986 (124-125[204-205]).

1983

126-127

YAU126-127Y

Volvo B10M-56

3752/4153

Marshall

H45/33F

128

YAU128Y

Volvo Citybus

?

Marshall

H45/33F

Nos. 126-128 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.

1984

4

A444DTO

Leyland TRCTL11/3

?

Plaxton

C53F

27

UFX627X

Bristol LHS6L

LHS-397

Plaxton

C53F

28

VPR862X

Bristol LHS6L

LHS-390

Plaxton

C53F

29

UFX629X

Bristol LHS6L

LHS-400

Plaxton

C53F

129-133

A129-33DTO

Volvo Citybus

?

East Lancs

H43/31F

206-210

A206-210DTO

Leyland Olympian

ON1090/89/
95-97

East Lancs

H45/27F

Nos. 4, 129-133 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.
Nos. 27-29 ex-Courtlands, Horley (Nos. 4, ?, 8 respectively, all new 1982).
Withdrawn 1986 (27-29, 206-210).

1985

5

B555HAL

Volvo B10M

?

Plaxton

C53F

6

B666KVO

Volvo B10M

?

Plaxton

C53F

134-143

B134-43GAU

Volvo Citybus

?

Marshall

H45/33F

Nos. 5-6, 134-143 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.

1986

7

C777PNU

Volvo B10M

?

Plaxton

C53F

144-148

C144-48NRR

Volvo Citybus

?

Northern Counties

H42/33F

247

OJD182R

Leyland FE30AGR

7603075

MCW

H45/32F

248

OJD188R

Leyland FE30AGR

7603233

MCW

H45/32F

249

OJD195R

Leyland FE30AGR

7603357

MCW

H45/32F

Nos. 7, 144-148 to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.
Nos. 247-249 ex-Thamesdown (new to London Transport as DMS2182, 2188, 2195 respectively in 1976); to Derby City Transport Ltd. 10/86 retaining same fleet numbers.

]]>
stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/derby-corporation-transport-bus-fleet-list-1968---1986 Wed, 21 Feb 2018 16:48:17 GMT
DERBY CORPORATION TRANSPORT BUS FLEET LIST 1899 - 1967 http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/derby-corporation-transport-bus-fleet-list-1899---1967 Derby Corporation Transport

Bus Fleet List
1899-1967

 

Fleet No.

Reg. No.

Chassis

Chassis No.

Body

Seating

Horse Buses

1899

1-5

-

Double-deck
open-top
three-horse
bus

-

?

16/12

Nos. 1-5 ex-Derby Tramways Company (new 1886 (1), 1887 (2), 1888 (3-5)).
Withdrawn 1905 (5), by 1909 (1-4).

1901

?

-

Single-deck
top-covered
two-horse
charabanc

-

Marston & Company (?)

22

?

-

Single-deck
top-covered
two-horse
charabanc

-

Marston & Company (?)

22

These two vehicles were classified as 'omnibuses' by 1905 and used in service; one was converted to an omnibus proper in 1909.
Withdrawn 1917 (two vehicles).

1903

6-9?

-

Double-deck
open-top
three-horse bus

-

-

20/17?

10-14?

-

Double-deck
open-top
two-horse
bus

-

-

?

Nos. 6-14 (of which only the fleet number for No.7 is known for certain) ex-Manchester Carriage & Tramways Company (new 1890).
Withdrawn by 1907 (three buses), by 1909 (remaining six buses).

1909

?

-

Single-deck
saloon
one-horse
bus

-

?

?

Withdrawn by 1917 (one bus).

Battery-powered Buses

1917

1

AY4058

GMC-Edison

-

Brush

B22F

Withdrawn 1923 (1).

1920

2

CH1812

GMC-Edison

-

Marston

B26F

Withdrawn 1924 (2).

Motorbuses

1924

1

CH4289

Tilling-Stevens TS5X

2420

Blackburn Aero

B20F

2

CH4381

Tilling-Stevens TS3A

3098

Marston

B26F

No. 2 (CH4381) was fitted with the body from the former No.2 (CH1812).
Withdrawn 1929 (1-2).

1925

3

CH5181

Tilling-Stevens TS6

3644

Dodson

B36R

Withdrawn 1933 (3).

1926

4

CH5948

Tilling-Stevens TS5A

2421

Dodson

B25F

Withdrawn 1930 (4).

1927

5-6

CH6367-6368

Tilling-Stevens TS6

3709/87

Brush

B35R

Withdrawn 1936 (5-6).

1928

7-12

CH7152-7157

Tilling-Stevens TS6

3793-94/92/
95-97

Brush

B35R

13-14

CH7881-7882

ADC

427004/03

Sanderson & Holmes

B28R

15

CH7877

TSM B10A2

5821

Sanderson & Holmes

B35R

16

CH7880

TSM B10A2

5822

Sanderson & Holmes

B35R

17-18

CH7885-7886

ADC

422097/96

Brush

H26/24R

Nos. 13-14 re-seated to B27R at a later date.
Withdrawn 1934 (13-14), 1936 (7-12, 15-16), 1939 (17-18).

1929

19-22

CH8337-8340

ADC

422105/02/
01/098

Brush

H24/24R

23-26

CH8341-8344

TSM B10A2

6362-63/
420/19

Sanderson & Holmes

B35F

27

CH8680

Guy FCX

22659

Short

H34/32R

28-29

CH8829-8830

Guy FCX

23469/71

Ransomes

H33/32R

Withdrawn 1938 (23-26), 1939 (19-22, 27), 1942 (29), 1945 (28).

1930

30-32

CH8831-8833

Guy FCX

23470/503/
472

Ransomes

H33/32R

33-38

CH9501-9506

Guy FC

23330/23/11/
24/32/31

Brush

H24/24R

Withdrawn 1944 (33-35), 1945 (31-32, 36-38), 1947 (30).

1931

39-41

RC101-103

TSM B10A2

8639-41

Ransomes

B32R

Withdrawn 1939 (39, 41), 1942 (40).

1932

42-43

RC542-543

Guy FC

23816-17

Ransomes

H24/24R

Withdrawn 1945 (42-43).

1933

44

UK7456

Sunbeam Sikh

K10123

Dodson

H35/32R

No. 44 ex-Sunbeam demonstrator (new 1929).
Withdrawn 1939 (44).

1934

45

RC2345

Crossley Alpha

91921

Brush

B35R

46

RC2346

Daimler COG5

8101

Brush

B35R

47

RC2347

Leyland TS6c

5233

Brush

B35R

Withdrawn 1939 (47), 1940 (46), 1941 (45).

1936

48-53

RC4248-4253

Daimler COG5

9721-26

Brush

H28/26R

Withdrawn 1949 (48, 50), 1950 (52), 1951 (49, 51), 1952 (53).

1938

54-63

RC6554-6563

Daimler COG5

10566-75

Brush

H28/26R

Withdrawn 1952 (55, 61), 1953 (56-59, 63), 1957 (54, 62), 1958 (60).

1939

64-73

RC7564-7573

Daimler COG5

10923-32

Brush

H28/26R

Withdrawn 1957 (65-67, 69-72), 1958 (68), 1960 (64, 73).

1942

1-2

RC8311-8312

Guy Arab I

FD25629/28

Massey

H30/26R

74

RC8274

Bristol K5G

57076

Strachan

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1961 (1-2, 74).

1943

3-5

RC8323-8325

Guy Arab I

FD25702-04

Park Royal

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1961 (3-5).

1944

6-7

RC8426-8427

Daimler CWA6

11654-55

Brush

L27/28R

8-9

RC8438-8439

Daimler CWA6

11569-70

Duple

H30/26R

10-11

RC8460-8461

Daimler CWA6

11703/53

Northern Counties

H30/26R

12-13

RC8462-8463

Guy Arab II

FD26650-51

Strachan

H30/26R

14-15

RC8484-8485

Guy Arab II

FD26829/31

Strachan

H30/26R

Nos. 6-7 fitted with 1938 Brush H28/26R bodies from Nos. 63, 57 respectively in 1953.
Withdrawn 1961 (6-7, 12-13), 1962 (8-11, 14-15).

1945

16

RC8616

Daimler CWD6

12271

Brush

H30/26R

17-18

RC8617-8618

Daimler CWA6

12272-73

Brush

H30/26R

19-20

RC8719-8720

Daimler CWA6D

12422/31

Brush

H30/26R

21

RC8721

Daimler CWA6D

12345

Duple

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1962 (17-18, 20-21), 1963 (16, 19).

1947

22-27

ACH622-627

Daimler CVD6

13532-37

Brush

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1963 (24), 1968 (23, 25-26), 1969 (22, 27).

1948

28-31

ACH628-631

Daimler CVD6

13538-41

Brush

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1968 (28-30), 1969 (31).

1949

32-41

BCH132-141

Daimler CVD6

15135-44

Brush

H30/26R

47*

EVC244

Daimler COG5/40

8558

Park Royal

B38F

75-79

BCH575-579

Daimler CVD6

16665-69

Brush

H30/26R

*No. 47 ex-Coventry Corporation (No. 244, new 1940). This vehicle was used for driver training and never used in public service, although it was given a fleet number.
Withdrawn 1963 (34, 37), 1968 (38-39, 41, 75-77, 79), 1969 (32-33, 35-36), 1970 (40, 78), 1973 (47).

1950

80-84

BCH580-584

Daimler CVD6

16670-74

Brush

H30/26R

85-94

BCH885-894

Daimler CVD6

16675-84

Brush

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1967 (84-85, 88-89), 1969 (81-82, 86, 90-93), 1970 (80, 83, 87, 94).

1952

95-104

CRC895-904

Daimler CVD6

17671-80

Willowbrook

H30/26R

105-109

CRC905-909

Foden PVD6

32232/34/
36/38/40

Brush

H30/26R

110-114

CRC910-914

Crossley DD42/8A

95308-09/
97-99

Brush

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1968 (108-109), 1969 (105-107, 112, 114), 1970 (95-104, 110-111, 113).

1957

115-124

KRC115-124

Daimler CVG6

19249-58

Park Royal

H32/28R

Nos. 115-124 re-seated to H33/28R in 1959.
Withdrawn 1973 (115, 118-123), 1974 (116-117, 124).

1961

125-134

VRC125-134

Daimler CVG6

19787-96

Roe

H37/28R

Withdrawn 1972 (125), 1976 (126, 129-132, 134), 1977 (133), 1978 (127-128).

1962

135-144

YRC135-144

Daimler CVG6

19898-907

Roe

H37/28R

Withdrawn 1974 (139-141, 144), 1976 (136), 1978 (137), 1979 (135, 142), 1980 (138, 143).

1963

145-154

145-154CCH

Daimler CVG6

19934-43

Roe

H37/28R

Withdrawn 1976 (148), 1978 (145-147, 149-154).

1964

155-164

BCH155-64B

Daimler CVG6

20073-82

Roe

H37/28R

Withdrawn 1976 (155, 157, 161-164), 1978 (156, 158), 1979 (159-160).

1966

165-171

HRC165-71C

Daimler CVG6

20146-52

Roe

H37/28R

172-174

HRC172-74C

Daimler CRG6LX

61032-34

Roe

H44/34F

175-184

KRC175-84D

Daimler CRG6LX

61502-11

Roe

H44/34F

185-189

KRC185-89D

Daimler CVG6

20177-81

Roe

H37/28R

Nos. 165-174 delivered with registration numbers FRC165-174C, but re-registered as shown before entry into service.
No. 174 re-seated to H44/31F in 1973.
Withdrawn 1977 (165, 167-169), 1978 (166, 170-171, 185, 189), 1979 (175, 178, 187), 1980 (179, 181-184, 186, 188), 1981 (177, 180), 1982 (174), 1983 (173), 1984 (172, 176).

1967

49-52

DCP849-852

Daimler CVG6

18581-84

MCCW

H33/26R

190-204

NCH190-204E

Daimler CRG6LX

62275-89

Roe

H44/34F

Nos. 49-52 ex-Halifax JOC (Nos. 296-299, new 1954)
Withdrawn 1969 (49-52), 1980 (191-192, 198), 1981 (193-194, 200, 202-203), 1982 (190, 196, 199, 201, 204), 1984 (195, 197).

]]>
stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/derby-corporation-transport-bus-fleet-list-1899---1967 Wed, 21 Feb 2018 16:45:10 GMT
DERBY CORPORATION TRANSPORT TROLLEYBUS FLEET LIST 1932 - 1967 http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/derby-corporation-transport-trolleybus-fleet-list-1932---1967 Derby Corporation Transport

Trolleybus Fleet List
1932-1967

 

Fleet No.

Reg. No.

Chassis

Chassis No.

Body

Seating

1932

79-84

RC401-406

Guy BTX

23756/58/54/
55/57/53

Brush

H29/27R

85-92

RC544-551

Guy BTX

23833-34/32/
35-36/38/37/
39

Dodson

H29/27R

93-98

RC793-798

Guy BTX

23841/40/43/
42/44-45

Dodson

H29/27R

99

RC799

Karrier E6

54044

Dodson

H29/27R

100

RC800

Sunbeam MS2

12006

Dodson

H29/27R

101

RC801

Ransomes

2154

Ransomes

H29/27R

Withdrawn 1946 (79-80, 84-85), 1948 (81-82, 86-87, 89-91, 93-95, 97), 1949 (83, 88, 92, 96, 98), 1950 (99-101).

1933

102-113

RC1102-1113

Guy BTX

23919/14-15/
13/17-18/16/
20-24

Weymann

H30/26R

114

RC1414

Thornycroft HD

22421

Brush

H30/26R

115-134

RC1615-1634

Guy BTX

23974-78/81-
82/79/91-92/
90/87/86/80/
94/98/89/83/
93/95

Brush

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1946 (108), 1947 (102-107), 1948 (128), 1949 (109-110, 127), 1950 (111-114, 122, 126, 134), 1951 (115-121, 123, 129-131, 133), 1952 (124-125, 132).

1934

135-138

RC2035-2038

Guy BTX

24023/25/
22/24

Brush

H30/26R

139-144

RC2319-2144

Guy BTX

24029/27/30/
26/28/31

Brush

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1948 (136), 1949 (135, 143), 1951 (137-139), 1952 (140-142, 144).

1935

145-148

RC2645-2648

Guy BTX

24067/66/
68-69

Brush

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1952 (145-148).

1936

149-158

RC4349-4358

Guy BTX

24213-22

Brush

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1949 (154), 1950 (150, 155), 1951 (149), 1952 (152, 156), 1953 (151, 153, 157-158).

1938

159-164

RC6659-6664

Daimler CTM4

20020/18-19/
23/21/22

Brush

H28/26R

Withdrawn 1959 (161), 1960 (159-160, 162-164).

1942

165

DY5113

Guy BTX

22845

Ransomes

B32C

166

DY5115

Guy BTX

22836

Ransomes

B32C

167

DY5123

Guy BTX

22887

Ransomes

B32C

168

DY5137

Guy BTX

22958

Ransomes

B32C

169

DY5140

Guy BTX

22957

Ransomes

B32C

170

DY5584

Guy BTX

23363

Ransomes

B32C

Nos. 165-170 ex-Hastings Tramways Company (Nos. 11, 13, 21, 35, 38, 57, new 1928 or 1929 (DY5584)); it is thought that Nos. 167 and 170 never ran in service with Derby Corporation before they were cannibalised for spares.
Withdrawn 1942 (167, 170), 1944 (166, 168), 1945 (165, 169).

1944

171-172

RC8471-8472

Sunbeam W

50087-88

Weymann

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1964 (171-172).

1945

173-175

RC8573-8575

Sunbeam W

50131-33

Park Royal

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1963 (173), 1964 (174-175).

1946

176-185

RC8876-8885

Sunbeam W

50314-23

Park Royal

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1964 (176-178, 180, 182), 1965 (179, 183, 185), 1966 (181, 184).

1948

186-196

ARC486-496

Sunbeam F4

50547-57

Brush

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1963 (186), 1964 (188), 1965 (187), 1966 (189-196).

1949

197-215

ARC497-515

Sunbeam F4

50558-61/
654-68

Brush

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1963 (213), 1964 (214), 1965 (197-198, 200, 202, 212), 1966 (199, 201, 203-206, 208-211), 1967 (207, 215).

1952

216-224

DRC216-224

Sunbeam F4

50745/47-49/
55/46/54/53/
50

Willowbrook

H32/28R

Withdrawn 1967 (216-224).

1953

225-235

DRC225-235

Sunbeam F4

50752/51/
56-64

Willowbrook

H32/28R

Withdrawn 1967 (225-235).

1960

236-243

SCH236-243

Sunbeam F4A

TFD74170-77

Roe

H37/28R

Withdrawn 1967 (236-243).

]]>
stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/derby-corporation-transport-trolleybus-fleet-list-1932---1967 Wed, 21 Feb 2018 16:33:39 GMT
DERBY CORPORATION TRANSPORT TRAM FLEET LIST 1899 - 1934 http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/derby-corporation-transport-tram-fleet-list-1899---1934 Derby Corporation Transport

Tram Fleet List
1899-1934

 

Fleet No.

Type

Trucks

Body

Seating

Horse Trams

1899

1-16

Single-deck
saloon
one-horse

-

Starbuck Car & Waggon Company

18

17-18

Double-deck
open-top
two-horse

-

Shrewsbury Waggon Company

18/16

19-20

Double-deck
open-top
two-horse

-

?

20/16

Nos. 1-20 ex-Derby Tramways Company (new 1880-1881 (1-16), 1887 (17-18), 1894 (19-20)); Nos. 1-16 later converted to two-horse cars.
No. 13 was converted to open-top in 1900.
Withdrawn by 1903 (2, 3 + one other ), by 1905 (1, 4-12, 14-16), by 1907 (13, 17-20).

1902

21-23

Double-deck
open-top
two-horse

-

?

20/16

Nos. 21-23 ex-Glasgow Corporation (new 1894).
Withdrawn by 1907 (21-23).

1903

2-3

Double-deck
open-top
two-horse

-

?

20/16

?

Double-deck
open-top
two-horse

-

?

20/16

Nos. 2, 3 (+ unknown car) ex-Glasgow Corporation (new 1894).
Withdrawn by 1907 (2, 3 + unknown car).

Electric Trams

1904

1-25

Double-deck
open-top
4-wheel

Brush AA

Brush

26/22

Nos. 1-12, 14, 17-25 re-trucked with Brill 21E trucks between 1913 and 1915.
Nos. 1, 3-4, 8-9, 22-23 fitted with Brush top-covers in 1924 or 1927 (22-23) and rebuilt to fully enclosed by Derby Corporation; probably all re-seated to 30/22.
Withdrawn 1928 (17), 1929 (12, 15), 1930 (24), 1932 (2, 5-7, 10-11, 13-14, 16, 18-21, 25), 1933 (1, 3-4, 8-9, 22-23).

1905

26-29

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Brush Conaty Radial

Brush

26/22

Nos. 26-29 re-trucked with Peckham P21B trucks in 1915.
Withdrawn 1932 (26-29).

1906

30-35

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Mountain & Gibson Radial

Milnes Voss

30/22

36-39

Single-deck
saloon
4-wheel

Mountain & Gibson Radial

Milnes Voss

32

Nos. 30-35 re-trucked with Peckham P22 trucks in 1920-1921.
Withdrawn 1932 (36-39), 1933 (30-35).

1907

40-41

Double-deck
open-top
4-wheel

Mountain & Gibson 21EM

Milnes Voss

24/18

42-44

Double-deck
open-top
4-wheel

Mountain & Gibson Radial

Milnes Voss

30/22

Nos. 40-41 fitted with Brush top-covers in 1913.
Nos. 42-44 fitted with Brush top-covers in 1913; re-trucked with Peckham P22 trucks in 1922.
Withdrawn 1930 (40), 1932 (41), 1933 (42-44).

1908

45-47

Double-deck
open-top
4-wheel

Mountain & Gibson 21EM

Milnes Voss

30/22

Nos. 45-47 re-trucked with Peckham P22 trucks in 1921; fitted with Brush top-covers in 1924.
Withdrawn 1931 (47), 1933 (45-46).

1911

48-50

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Brush Flexible

Brush

30/22

Withdrawn 1933 (48-50).

1920

51-56

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Peckham P22

Brush

30/22

Withdrawn 1934 (51-56).

1921

57-60

Double-deck
top-covered
4-wheel

Peckham P22

Brush

30/22

Withdrawn 1932 (57), 1934 (58-60).

1925

61-66

Double-deck
fully-enclosed
4-wheel

Peckham P22

Brush

30/22

Withdrawn 1934 (61-66).

1926

67-72

Double-deck
fully-enclosed
4-wheel

Peckham P22

Brush

30/22

Withdrawn 1934 (67-72).

1927

73-78

Double-deck
fully-enclosed
4-wheel

Peckham P22

Brush

30/22

Withdrawn 1934 (73-78).

]]>
stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/derby-corporation-transport-tram-fleet-list-1899---1934 Wed, 21 Feb 2018 16:30:35 GMT
DERBY CORPORATION TRANSPORT 1899 - 1986 http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/derby-corporation-transport-1899-1986 Derby Corporation Transport

1899-1986

 

Horse omnibuses had made an appearance in Derby by the early 1840's and by the 1850's omnibuses were operating a number of local services. Amongst those documented are William Wallis and John Miers, both of whom operated from the newly opened railway station into the town itself; whilst Edward Fisher provided a service to Castle Donington; Joseph Pickard to Wirksworth, and George Horsley to Melbourne, the latter service starting on 9th October 1857. In 1877, the Derby Omnibus Company introduced a network of horse-bus services from Uttoxeter Road to the station; from Osmaston Road to the station and from Corden Street, New Normanton via the town centre to the Bridge Inn on City Road. Hardly had these services started when, in October 1877, the Derby Tramways Company was registered, however it was to be another few years before the Company was able to begin construction of the new tramway. On the 6th March 1880, the first route opened, running from the Market Place along St. Peter's Street to the Midland Railway's station. On 1st October 1880 a second line from Victoria Street to Windmill Hill opened, and on the 8th October a line from The Spot to Cotton Lane was added to the system. The final extensions were opened in 1881 when lines to the Normanton Hotel from The Spot, and to Deadman's Lane from London Road were inaugurated. The initial rolling stock consisted of 16 (Nos. 1-16) single-deck cars by Starbuck, followed by four double-deck cars (Nos. 17-20), two in 1887 (by the Shrewsbury Waggon Company) and two in 1894 (manufacturer unknown). The depot was in Friar Gate. The Company also operated a number of horse-bus services inherited from the previous operators who were acquired as a condition of the construction of the tramway.

The Derby Corporation Act of 1899 empowered the Corporation to purchase the existing horse tramway. On the 1st November 1899, Derby Corporation took control of the Company and rolling stock. New powers, obtained under the 1901 Derby Corporation Act, authorised the construction of new lines and the electrification of existing lines, although it was not until November 1903 that work commenced on converting the system. Meanwhile the horse services continued as normal and Derby Corporation overhauled the fleet and withdrew some of the older single-deck vehicles. One car (No. 13) was converted to an open-top car, and, in 1902 and 1903, six redundant double-deck cars were purchased from Glasgow Corporation.

In July 1904 a new tramcar depot was opened on Osmaston Road, and on the 27th July the first electric routes commenced. The first sections opened were from The Spot to the Harrington Arms at Alvaston; a branch line to the Midland Railway's station, and from The Spot to Abingdon Street (to serve the new depot). The first electric trams were double-deck open-top Brush-built cars (Nos. 1-25), followed in 1905 by four (Nos. 26-29) top-covered cars. On 4th September 1904 an extension from The Spot to Victoria Street was opened, followed shortly afterwards (on 18th September) by a short line between London Road and Osmaston Road, via Bateman Street.

The last horse tram ran on 1st June 1907, by which time the system was almost complete, the final section (the line along Nottingham Road to the Cemetery) opening on the 8th February 1908. The last horse bus route, however, to Mansfield Road, continued to operate until 19th May 1917, when an Edison battery-powered bus took over, although two of the horses and two horse buses were retained until 1919.

The advent of the Great War of 1914-1918 brought about a general decline in the track and rolling stock and by 1920 the Tramways Department were considering renewing and repairing the existing track and acquiring new tramcars. The first new tramcars for almost ten years were Nos. 51-56, Brush-built, top-covered, double-deckers, which entered service in 1920, followed shortly afterwards by Nos. 57-60, which entered service in 1921.

Meanwhile, a second battery-powered bus had been purchased in 1920, but neither of the vehicles proved particularly reliable. No.1 was withdrawn in December 1923 and when problems arose with No.2, it led to a complete breakdown in the Mansfield Road service. As a result, the Tramways Committee turned to the petrol-electric bus, which, without gears, was an easy transition for motormen to make. An order was placed with Tilling-Stevens for the supply of two chassis. One received a 20-seat body by the Blackburn Aeroplane & Motor Company, of Leeds, whilst the other received the Marston body from battery-bus No. 2, which was only four years old.

On the 30th June 1924, the last battery-bus ran along Mansfield Road, and the following day, the first Derby Corporation motorbus (No. 1: CH4289) took over. The second vehicle (No. 2: CH4381) entered service in August 1924.

During the 1920's, with the development of the Osmaston Park Road area, which, at the time, had little public transport, Derby Corporation decided to inaugurate another motorbus service. A petrol-electric Tilling-Stevens was purchased (No. 3: CH5181), and the route, from The Spot, Osmaston Road, Charnwood Street, Normanton Road, Pear Tree Road, Portland Street and Victory Road, was opened on 27th July 1925. By April 1927, more housing development had seen the route extended to the tram terminus on Osmaston Road. The extended route proved profitable and heralded a new era of expansion, which balanced the decline of the tramway. In 1928, routes to Stackbrook Road via Abbey Street, to Mackenzie Street via Slack Lane, and to Overdale Road via Mill Hill Lane opened. Six more petrol-electric Tilling-Stevens joined the fleet, along with four single-deck ADC's later in the year.

The following year, on 21st August 1929, the Town Council decided to abandon the tramway system, surprisingly, in favour of trolleybuses. The Derby Corporation Act of 1930 granted the necessary powers, although it would be 1932 before the first services were inaugurated. On 9th January 1932, the first trolleybus ceremoniously departed on the Nottingham Road route, driven by the Mayor. The first trolleybuses delivered were six-wheeled Guy BTX (Nos. 79-84) with Brush bodywork. Eight similar vehicles (Nos. 85-92) arrived in July 1932, this time with Dodson bodywork, enabling the trams on the Alvaston route (and the buses on the Harvey Road route, extended on 13th November to the Mitre) to be replaced. Later in the year, more Dodson-bodied Guys arrived (Nos. 93-98), enabling the conversion of the Osmaston Road route.

In 1933, the tramway abandonment continued apace. On 13th August 1933, motorbuses (freed by the extension of the trolleybus route to Chain Lane and Corden Avenue, which ran along part of the Uttoxeter Road bus route) replaced the trams on the Kedleston Road route (subsequently extended to Allestree Lane End in 1935), and on 31st December 1933, trolleybuses replaced the trams on the Ashbourne Road route.

During this period there was little development of the bus network, and expansion was almost at a standstill, most of the effort being put into tramway conversion. In August 1933, the first part of the Normanton Road Circular tram route between Midland Road and Bateman Street was converted to trolleybus operation, although it was to be March 1934 before the remaining section along Normanton Road was opened. This effectively brought tramcar operations to an end in Derby, although some works journeys along Osmaston Road lasted until 30th June 1934. On the 2nd July 1934, car 78, was taken to Victoria Street for the last time, and ceremoniously driven along the tracks with its destination blind set to 'Osmaston Road Depot', and the tramway era in Derby was over.

With the continuing expansion of Derby's suburbs, new trolleybus routes were introduced. In June 1935 a new service to Browning Circle on the Austin Lane estate was introduced, and in November 1936 a new route to Allenton (extended to Shelton Lock in 1938), via the Chaddesdon Park Road area, commenced. At the same time the motorbus service along Osmaston Park Road was converted to trolleybus operation and in 1937 a route to Darley Park Drive from the Cornmarket opened.

In certain areas, however, the motorbus was favoured. The development of the Sussex Circus estate, with its twists and turns was unsuitable for trolleybus operation and so motorbuses were extended from nearby termini to serve the estate. To help implement the new services and to replace older vehicles, 20 (Nos. 54-73) Daimler COG5's with Brush H28/26R bodywork were purchased in 1938 and 1939.

With the onset of World War II, Derby Corporation, along with many other operators at the time, suffered severe difficulties in maintaining the fleet, even though many services were reduced or curtailed altogether. Utility vehicles delivered in wartime included a lone Bristol K5G chassis (No. 74), and, to ease the situation further, a number of second-hand single-deck trolleybuses were purchased from the Hastings Tramway Company (Nos. 165-170).

After the cessation of hostilities, the fleet was in need of replacement and between November 1948 and March 1949, 30 new Sunbeam F4 trolleybuses (186-215) with Brush 56-seat bodywork entered service. At the same time the bus fleet was augmented by the arrival of new Daimler CVD6's (Nos. 22-41 and 75-79) with similar Brush bodywork, which enabled some of the prewar vehicles to be relegated to peak hour duties. A joint service to Littleover, with local bus company Trent Motor Traction, the first such co-operation between the two operators, commenced early in 1950, and, in October, a second joint service, to Trenton Green, was introduced.

In 1952, along with another batch of Daimler CVD6's (Nos. 95-104) came five Foden PVD6's (105-109) and five Crossley DD42's (110-114), the delivery of which enabled most of the prewar Daimlers to be withdrawn.

In 1955, plans were drawn up for an extension of the trolleybus system along Ashbourne, Uttoxeter and Mansfield Roads, but a public outcry about the despoiling of the Derbyshire countryside by traction poles, and the fact that bus services were already running, forced a public enquiry. Opponents of the proposals won the day and the planned service extensions were dropped. This effectively sounded the death knell for the trolleybus, since it was unlikely that any future extensions would be sanctioned, even though the profitability of the trolleybus (costing less than 1p per mile to run) was far in excess of that of the motorbus (which cost around 3.5p per mile to run). Subsequently route extensions used motorbuses; in January 1955 a service to Boulton Lane Estate via Radford Street commenced, followed in July by another motorbus service to St. Andrew's View via Perth Street. An extension of the Morley Street route to Lyttelton Street in June 1958, and to Scarborough Rise in August of the same year (jointly with Trent) were more routes worked by motorbuses.

The first cutbacks in the trolleybus network occurred in the early 1960's, although in 1960 eight new trolleybuses were purchased. The system at that time was over 26 miles in length, and some of the older vehicles had given nearly 20 years service. By 1964, however, the Kingscroft and Burton Road routes had been abandoned and in 1966, the Sinfin Lane and Wyndham Street trolleybus services ceased. Scheduled services on Uttoxeter Road, Victoria Street, Cavendish, and Midland Station sections were withdrawn in November 1966, although, with the wires remaining in place the occasional full service and works services continued to operate infrequently due to staffing difficulties until 9th September 1967, the final day of trolleybus operations in Derby. The official last trolleybus was No. 224, specially decorated for the occasion; it actually arrived in the depot before several others. The last trolleybus to operate in service was No. 236, which finally arrived back in the depot at 15 minutes past midnight on Sunday morning the 10th September 1967, closing another chapter in the history of transport in Derby.

Continuing staffing difficulties led to the introduction of one-man operation, which until 1966, was confined to single-deck vehicles, although Derby's first rear-engined front-entrance vehicles (Nos. 172-174) arrived in 1965. The introduction of the Government's Bus Grant in 1968, also favoured the front-entrance rear-engined layout, offering grants of up to 50% on the cost of a new bus of this sort of design. Derby bought their last rear-entrance open-platform vehicle in 1967, all subsequent purchases being of the Government favoured type, spelling an end for the traditional conductor and driver crew-operated vehicles in the borough. In May 1969, a new livery of blue and grey replaced the traditional olive green and cream, used by the Corporation since 1904, although the last vehicle to bear the livery (No. 156) did so until withdrawal in 1978.

Co-ordinated bus services in the area between the Corporation and Trent Motor Traction were once again introduced to supplement the original three over twenty years earlier. This resulted in some long-established Trent routes being turned over to the Corporation, including the Allestree and Darley Abbey Circulars. Eventually an agreement was reached (signed on 1st April 1979) whereby all services were co-ordinated throughout the city, with 83% of them being run by the Corporation and 17% by Trent.

On the 1st December 1973, Derby Corporation took over the long established business of Blue Bus Services of Willington, including the depot and two stage carriage services. The company continued in existence as the private hire section of the Transport Department.

In 1974 the title of the undertaking became Derby Borough Transport, and was changed again in 1977 (when Derby was granted city status) to Derby City Transport.

Deliveries of front entrance vehicles continued throughout the 1970's, with the Corporation opting for the Leyland Fleetline until it was withdrawn in the early 1980's. As a result a number of different makes appeared in Derby including a single Volvo Ailsa (No. 71), Foden (No. 101), an MCW Metrobus (No. 102), and three Dennis Dominators (Nos. 103-105). In the event, problems with all except the Volvo resulted in the Corporation ordering Volvo buses for delivery throughout the 1980's. The Leyland successor to the Fleetline was the Olympian, a poor substitute for a fine vehicle, which did not find favour with Derby Corporation and, although 7 in total were purchased, they were to last only a few years in service.

On the 26th October 1986, Derby City Transport became an 'arm's-length' limited company, Derby City Transport Limited, under the terms of the new Transport Act. This effectively took the Transport Department out of the municipal sector, although the company's major shareholder continued to be the local Council until 1994 when the undertaking passed to the British Bus organisation, finally ending municipal involvement in Derby's transport system over 80 years after the first Corporation tram had run.

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stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/derby-corporation-transport-1899-1986 Wed, 21 Feb 2018 16:23:57 GMT
LAST DAYS OF OLDHAM TRAMS http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/last-days-of-oldham-trams LAST DAY OF OLDHAM'S TRAMS.

The abandonment of its last tramcar service on Saturday 3rd August 1946, by Oldham Corporation Tramways, was made an occasion of some ceremony. It was estimated that 40,000 people lined the route that summer evening. 


A contemporary report of the time commented on the event as follows:-
"A party of some 100 people made up of Town Councillors, Officials of the Transport Department, their wives and friends, assembled in the Wallshaw Street Tram Depot just after 10 p.m. to attend the closing ceremony of the Tramway system, (to be carried out by the Mayor Alderman Stirling T. Marron J.P.) after 46 years service to the Town and population.

Car No. 4 had been repainted and decorated specially for the occasion, carrying around the top deck flags of different colours on which were printed the names of the principle points formerly served by Oldham's trams.

A large number of coloured electric light bulbs replaced the indicator boxes and on one dash was painted the phrase 
1900 "Honourably Retiring" 1946     with     1900 "Progressive Efficiency" 1946  -  on the other.
After being in service during the afternoon she finally ran behind the last service car from the Town Hall to Waterhead, back to Hollinwood, and thence to Wallshaw Street Depot. 

On the last trip she was driven by the Mayor, dressed in tall hat, frock coat, and striped trousers and carried officials of the Department, members of the Council, and their wives and friends. 
For all the Mayor drove the tram most of the way, it was actually in the charge of the oldest Driver, Mr. James Jackson, who had 37 years' service, and the oldest Conductor (or should that be Guard), Mr. Ralph Partington, who had been punching tickets for over 40 years.
At the end of the run a supper was served at the Depot, the Mayor being presented with the tramcar gong as a momento of the occasion."

So passed Oldham's Tramway service in to the history books.

During its 46 years of life the cars had run some 81 million miles, carried 982,941,978 fare paying passengers through all weathers (and we all know what Oldham weather is like) without serious mishap. The trams were a success on all the routes, and were a paying proposition, and for several years the Tramways Committee would make a generous contribution to the rates of the town.

Six cars Nos. 17, 18, 24, 122, 125, and 128, survived the closure of the system and were sold to the Gateshead and District Tramways Company becoming Nos. 72, 71, 35, 68, 69, and 70 respectively in that Company's fleet.
The remainder were broken up in the depot, the majority of the bodies being sold to a Morecambe Holiday Camp, and the trucks and motors going to Calcutta, where no doubt they gave a good many years further service.

A Fleet list of Oldham Corporation Tramways can be seen here

 

Tram No.4 on the last day of operation on Saturday 3rd August 1946

 

 

 

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stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/last-days-of-oldham-trams Wed, 21 Feb 2018 15:54:29 GMT
NORTH WESTERN ROAD CAR COMPANY LIMITED http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/north-western-road-car-company-limited Brief History of North Western Road Car Company Ltd.

                              1923-1974

The North Western Road Car Company Limited was incorporated on the 23rd April 1923, when the green and cream buses of the British Automobile Traction Company, operating in the Peak District area under the fleet name 'British' were transferred to the new company, of which both the BAT and Tilling companies held a fifty per cent share. The number of vehicles that passed to North Western is not known for certain but it was in excess of 50, and the network of services that had already been built up numbered 22 routes in and around the Peak District. The fleet had been based at Macclesfield but in 1924 the company decided on a move to a new depot, workshop and offices that had been built in Charles Street, Stockport.

Further new routes were opened in 1923 between Glossop and Marple Bridge; Stockport and Denton, and Stockport and Mellor. Competition on some of the established routes was experienced, but fortunately did not amount to a serious threat and was soon overcome.

In 1924 further services were introduced in Saddleworth and developed extensively over the next few years and in 1926 and 1927 co-ordination agreements with Oldham Corporation, into whose operating area North Western had penetrated, were signed. In 1928 premises in Crofton Street, Oldham were acquired and towards the end of the decade joint operations were in force with Rochdale Corporation, Stalybridge, Hyde, Mossley and Dukinfield Joint Board and limited stop services between Saddleworth and Manchester via Oldham, jointly with Oldham and Manchester Corporations were also running.

On the 24th November 1924 the vehicles, services and depots at Northwich and Flixton, of the Mid-Cheshire Motor Bus Co. Ltd of Northwich were taken over, followed in 1926 by the acquisition of Altrincham & District Motor Services Ltd.

New routes continued to be introduced, particularly from Northwich, which was connected with Knutsford, Tarporley, Cuddington, Frodsham, Holmes Chapel and Warrington in 1925. In June 1926 the company inaugurated its first express service from Northwich to Blackpool.

To cater for this rapid expansion new central workshops, adjacent to the Charles Street garage were built in 1926 and subsequently all major engineering works were carried out here.

Further expansion took place in 1927 when the local tramway systems in Matlock and Glossop closed down within a few months of each other. North Western introduced local services in both towns and by the end of the year the Company was operating over 200 buses and in excess of 80 routes.

An agreement with Manchester City Council made it possible to extend certain routes into the city from 1st March 1928, and subsequently North Western entered into agreements with other municipal operators for joint running into the city. On the 13th March, the business of Tetlow & Collier of Flixton was acquired, which included a number of local routes in and around Flixton and Urmston along with a fleet of six vehicles.

On the 15th March 1929, North Western became a member of the Limited Stop Pool, which operated a service between Newcastle and Liverpool that had been inaugurated in 1928 by Northern General. This was the year that the first Leylands entered the fleet, breaking the monopoly held by the Tilling-Stevens chassis that had been favoured since 1924, although Tilling-Stevens vehicles continued to be purchased for a few more years.

The Railway (Road Transport) Act of 1928 gave the railway companies the power to operate bus services and as a result the London, Midland & Scottish Railway and the London & North Eastern Railway jointly acquired a half share in the Company.

Two years later the Road Traffic Act of 1930 came into force, bringing major changes in the regulations for licensing vehicles, personnel and routes. All existing operators were required to apply for licences and North Western duly applied for the licences they required. The majority of routes were granted a licence, with only a small number being rejected, many of which were granted following an appeal, and, in general, the outcome for North Western was satisfactory. The Road Traffic Act also removed the uncertainty over acquiring existing operators and routes, since previously there was no guarantee that another would not replace an acquired operator. The Road Traffic Act made this now very unlikely and consequently North Western was able to expand by purchasing many independent operators' licences for local routes, tours and excursions, and between 1932 and the beginning of World War II around 50 competitors were taken over.

With the onset of World War II in 1939, many services were curtailed or abandoned due to fuel restrictions and some of North Westerns' vehicles were requisitioned for war work. As the war progressed, however, greater numbers of passengers were using the company's vehicles a trend that continued for a time after the war had ended. In 1942, the alliance between Tilling and British Automobile Traction was dissolved and the undertakings jointly owned were allocated to one or other of the new companies. Despite North Westerns' long association with Tilling it was allocated to the BET Group. At the time North Western was favouring the Bristol/ECW combination for its new deliveries and this decision was to result in that combination becoming unavailable in the future. Between 1942 and 1945 North Western received a number of utility specification buses predominantly of Guy manufacture, many of which were exchanged after the war for the preferred Bristol chassis.

North Western emerged from the conflict with little damage to vehicles and premises and service improvements were quickly introduced. As wartime regulations were relaxed tours and excursions were re-introduced and in June 1946 limited express services were resumed. Difficulties in obtaining new vehicles in the immediate postwar period were experienced by many operators and as a result many opted for the rebodying of older chassis. North Western was no exception and in the first two years after war ended approximately 100 of its vehicles had been re-bodied. Over the next few years even more chassis were re-bodied, giving some an extended life of over 25 years when finally withdrawn.

In 1950 the entire intake of new vehicles was of Bristol manufacture, although a number of second-hand Leyland double-deckers were acquired. These were to be the last Bristol vehicles added to the fleet following the nationalisation of the Tilling Group companies and the consequent withdrawal of the Bristol marque from the open market. It was to be some 18 years later before Bristol vehicles were again available to North Western and in the meantime the Company had to look elsewhere for their new vehicles. The Chief Engineer, however, decided that there was no current substitute for the Bristol chassis that would prove as durable and reliant, a situation that eventually culminated in the design of a new chassis, which evolved as a heavy underfloor-engined vehicle. Atkinson Vehicles of Preston co-operated with North Western in its construction. The first two Atkinsons (Nos. 394-395[EDB321-322]) entered service in 1951, with fourteen more the following year. The Company was evidently pleased with the vehicle for it requested a sanction from the BET management for the purchase of another 100, but sadly this was refused, since the group was already committed to purchasing the Leyland Royal Tiger, which made up the bulk of deliveries to North Western for the next few years.

In 1953 a joint service from Manchester to Great Yarmouth was established by linking North Westerns' Manchester to Nottingham service with Trent Motor Traction's Nottingham to Great Yarmouth service, despite objections.

By the middle of the 1950's the motorbus had seen its heyday and the rise in private car ownership coupled with the change in social habits led to a decline in passenger numbers across the transport industry. In the chairman's report of 1956 it had been stated that over one half of North Westerns' stage carriage services were operated at a loss. This is easy to understand when one considers that much of the company's operating area was relatively rural, being heavily subsidised by services in the more populated urban areas. Over half of the revenue was swallowed up by staff wages and the Suez crisis saw a reduction in mileage and passengers carried, a trend that was to continue. Nevertheless the Company still managed to make a small profit, but economies needed to be sought. As a result there were the inevitable continual fare rises and consequent loss of passengers. Some of the less remunerative journeys were cut and services withdrawn. In 1958 one-man operation was introduced when the route from Cheadle to Heald Green was converted. Eventually all suitable routes were converted.

Altrincham Coachways Ltd became the first major acquisition since before the war when they were purchased on the 31st January 1958, followed closely on the 21st March by Melba Motors Ltd of Reddish, both of which were operated as subsidiaries until 1967.

Large capacity double-deckers based on the design of the Bristol Lodekka and manufactured under licence by Dennis Brothers as the Loline made their appearance in 1960. Batches of these vehicles were purchased in the following years, but the rear-engined double-decker superseded them in the fleet in 1963.

In 1961 the company's operating area was split into a Northern, Central and Southern Division, with the intention of increasing efficiency and revenue. New express services to Llandudno, Aberystwyth and Cleethorpes were introduced in 1963.

In 1967 the BET Group agreed terms with the Transport Holding Company for the transfer of its bus interests to the nationalised group. North Western (in whom the BET had a 44% share) became a subsidiary of the THC until the formation of the National Bus Company on 1st January 1969. In the meantime another express service commenced between Manchester, Brighton and Eastbourne operated jointly with BMMO and Southdown. Bristol vehicles had again become available on the open market and North Western immediately placed orders.

The Transport Act of 1968 was instrumental in setting up Passenger Transport Authorities and the area in which North Western had a major involvement was the area covered by the South East Lancashire and North East Cheshire (SELNEC) Passenger Transport Executive. On the 1st November 1969 the PTE absorbed eleven local authority undertakings and was given the responsibility of co-ordinating the stage carriage services within its area. Over half of North Westerns' stage services were operated in the SELNEC PTE area, which started negotiations with the National Bus Company over the future of the Company's services. In 1971 it was agreed that the PTE would take over the stage carriage services of the North Western Road Car Company that operated within its area and accordingly a new company the North Western (SELNEC Division) Road Car Company Limited was formed in November 1971. On the 1st January 1972 it took over operation of the stage carriage services of the North Western Road Car Company in the PTE operating area. It was realised that the remainder of North Westerns' stage carriage services would not be viable and a decision was reached to divide them between other members of the National Bus Company. Services in Biddulph, Macclesfield and Northwich were transferred to Crosville Motor Services in January 1972, and, on 4th March 1972, the services in Buxton, Matlock and Castleton passed to the Trent Motor Traction Company. On the same day the major part of the company the North Western (SELNEC Division) Road Car Company Ltd passed into SELNEC PTE ownership and was re-named SELNEC Cheshire Bus Company Limited.

All these changes left North Western as purely a coach operator without any stage services at all. All that remained was a depot in Manchester and offices at the Lower Mosley Street Bus Station. The Central Activities Group of the NBC planned to segregate all stage services from coaching and selected North Western with which to implement these polices in the northwest. Ribble subsidiary WC Standerwick subsequently became a wholly owned subsidiary of North Western. On the 6th February 1974 the North Western Road Car Company Limited was re-named National Travel (North West) Limited. The dismantling of a once proud company was complete and the famous old name passed into history.

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stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/north-western-road-car-company-limited Wed, 21 Feb 2018 15:40:17 GMT
OLDHAM CORPORATION TRANSPORT BUS FLEET LIST http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/oldham-corporation-transport-fleet-list  


Oldham Corporation Transport

Trolleybus Fleet List
1925-26


Fleet No.

Reg. No.

Chassis

Chassis No.

Body

Seating

1925

1

BU3861

Railless LFT30

-

Short

B36C

2

BU3854

Railless LFT30

-

Short

B36C

Withdrawn 1926 (1-2).


Bus Fleet List
1913-1969

Fleet No.

Reg. No.

Chassis

Chassis No.

Body

Seating

1913

-

BU11

Tilling-Stevens TTA2

?

Tilling-Stevens

O18/16RO

-

BU401-02

Tilling-Stevens TTA2

?

Tilling-Stevens

O18/16RO

It also quoted that another open-top double-deck was purchased at this time (possibly a Halley), which was withdrawn in 1920 but this has not been confirmed and no details have been uncovered for this vehicle.
BU401 rebodied with second-hand single-deck body (make unknown) 1917. Withdrawn 1917 (BU11, BU402), 1918 (BU401).

1918

-

BU69

Electromobile

?

-

-

Received single-deck body from withdrawn BU401 in 1918.
Withdrawn 1919.

1924

1-5

BU3402-06

Leyland C9

35128-32

Leyland

B24F

No. 5 re-seated to B28F in 1931.
Withdrawn 1933 (2, 4), 1934 (1, 3, 5).

1925

6-9

BU3672-75

Leyland C7

33507-10

Leyland

B28F

10

TB2553

Leyland

?

?

O??/??RO

No. 10 (TB2553), ex- Belgrave Mills Ltd. It was traded in part-exchange for one of the AEC's of 1926. [It has also been quoted by some sources that 10 such vehicles were purchased. This has probably been caused by confusion with the fleet number].
Withdrawn 1925 (10), 1933 (6), 1934 (7-9)

1926

10-17

BU3991-98

AEC 507

502010/09/07/
08/12/11/14/
13

Roe

H26/26RO

18-20

BU4509-11

Guy BX

BX22179-81

Roe

H26/24RO

21-27

BU4574-80

Guy BKX

BKX22212/11/
341/48/40/46/
47

Guy

B32R

Withdrawn 1934 (10-27).

1927

28-29

BU4838-39

Karrier WL6/1

45013/12

Short

B39R

30-32

BU4840-42

Guy FCX

FCX22486/98/
60

Roe

B39R

33-34

BU4843-44

Guy FCX

FCX22504/20

Roe

H30/26RO

Nos. 30-32 reseated to B37R in 1931.
Withdrawn 1933 (28-29), 1935 (30-34).

1928

35

BU5172

Karrier DD6/1

47005

Hall-Lewis

H36/34R

36

BU5173

Guy FCX

FCX22658

Short

H38/34R

37

BU5264

Karrier CL6

38047

Hall-Lewis

B33R

38

BU5262

Karrier CL6

38018

Hall-Lewis

B33R

39

BU5267

Karrier CL6

38050

Hall-Lewis

B33R

40

BU5263

Karrier CL6

38024

Hall-Lewis

B33R

41

BU5266

Karrier CL6

38049

Hall-Lewis

B33R

42

BU5265

Karrier CL6

38048

Hall-Lewis

B33R

43-48

BU5550-55

Karrier DD6

47015/14/12/
16/13/17

English Electric

H36/30R

49-56

BU5556-63

Guy FCX

FCX22941/38/
34/44/40/43/
29/39

English Electric

H36/30R

Withdrawn 1933 (35, 37-48), 1935 (36), 1936 (49-56).

1929

57

WH1352

ADC426

426121

Bell

B32D

58

WH1441

ADC426

426201

Burlingham

B32D

Ex-Tognarelli, Bolton (both new 1929).
No. 57 rebuilt to B32R at a later date.
No.58 also quoted as Bell B32F bodywork.
Withdrawn 1934 (57-58).

1931

59-62

BU6760-63

Leyland TS3

61754-57

Roe

B31F

Withdrawn 1948 (59-62).

1932

63-66

BU7102-05

Leyland TS4

918-21

Roe

B33F

67

BU7106

Leyland TS4

922

Shearing and Crabtree

B31F

68-75

BU7107-7114

Leyland TD2

910-17

Leyland

H27/24R

Withdrawn 1947 (68-71, 74-75), 1948 (63-67), 1949 (72-73).

1933

10-17

BU7600-07

Leyland TD2

2930-37

English Electric

H28/26R

21-29

BU7608-16

Leyland TS4

2921-29

Roe

B32F

Withdrawn 1947 (11), 1948 (10, 12-17, 21-22, 25-27), 1950 (23-24, 28-29).

1934

18-20

BU8254-56

Leyland TS6

5070-72

Roe

FB32F

30-35

BU8257-62

Leyland TD3

5073-78

Roe

H30/24R

57

BU7945

Crossley Mancunian

91746

Roe

H29/24R

58

BU7946

Leyland TD3

4390

English Electric

H28/26R

57, 30-35, reseated to H30/26R by 1936.
Withdrawn 1947 (30-35), 1948 (58, 18-20), 1949 (57).

1935

1-5

BU8421-25

Crossley Mancunian

91794-98

Roe

H29/24R

76-101

BU8426-51

Leyland TD3

5485-510

Roe

H30/24R

102-104

BU8573-75

Leyland TD4

7166-68

Leyland

H26/26R

106-109

BU8861-64

Leyland TD4

7710/14/16-17

English Electric

H30/26R

110-113

BU8865-68

Leyland TD4

7709/12-13/15

Roe

H30/26R

114-115

BU8972-73

Leyland TD4

8257-58

Roe

H30/26R

117-119

BU8975-77

Leyland TD4

8260-62

English Electric

H30/26R

Nos. 76-101 re-seated to H30/26R by 1936
Withdrawn 1948 (77-78, 83, 89-92, 106, 108, 113, 115, 119), 1949 (80, 82, 84-87, 94-96, 98-101, 109, 111-112, 117-118), 1950 (1-3, 81, 88, 97, 107, 110, 114), 1951 (4-5, 76, 79, 93), 1954 (102-104).

1936

105

BU8860

Leyland TD4

7711

Metro-Cammell

H30/26R

116

BU8974

Leyland TD4

8259

Roe

H30/26R

36-41

BU9260-65

Leyland TD4

9611-16

English Electric

H30/26R

42-47

BU9266-71

Leyland TD4

10001-06

Roe

H30/26R

120-125

BU9621-26

Leyland TD4

11000-05

English Electric

H30/26R

126-131

BU9627-9632

Leyland TD4

11006-11

Roe

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1949 (38, 40-41, 43, 47, 122, 125), 1950 (36-37, 39, 42, 44, 105, 116, 120-121, 123), 1952 (45-46, 124), 1957 (126-131).

1937

132-152

ABU350-70

Leyland TD5

13816-27/
4917-25

English Electric

H30/26R

153-167

ABU371-85

Leyland TD5

14926-40

Roe

H31/25R

168-173

ABU386-91

Daimler COG6

10171-76

Roe

H28/25R

Nos. 168-173 re-seated to H28/25R at a later date.
Nos. 132-133, 135-138, 140 rebuilt by Samlesbury Engineering in 1949.
Nos. 143, 146, 148-150 rebuilt by Hearn in 1949.
Withdrawn 1950 (134, 139, 141-142, 144-145, 147, 151-152), 1954 (137-138, 140, 143, 146, 148-150), 1955 (132-133, 135-136, 166, 173), 1956 (164), 1957 (153-163, 165, 167-172).

1938

174-179

ABU859-64

Leyland TD5

17518-23

Leyland

H30/26R

Withdrawn 1956 (174), 1957 (175-179).

1939

180-199

CBU180-199

Leyland TD5

303683-702

Roe

H31/25R

Withdrawn 1958 (180-199).

1940

200-210

CBU200-210

Leyland TD5

303703-13

Roe

H31/25R

Withdrawn 1958 (200-210).

1941

211-226

CBU211-226

Leyland TD5

303714-29

Roe

H31/25R

Withdrawn 1957 (218-219), 1958 (211-217, 220-226).

1944

227

DDK256

Leyland TD5

300673

Leyland

H30/26R

Ex-Yelloway MS (new 1938).
Withdrawn 1952 (227).

1946

228-241

DBU20-33

Leyland PD1

460572-79/
1539/45-49

Roe

H31/25R

Withdrawn 1966 (228, 230, 234-235, 238-240), 1967 (229, 231-233, 236-237, 241).

1947

242-257

DBU242-257

Leyland PD1/3

470788-91/
808-11/28-31/
933-34/53-54

Roe

H31/25R

258-266

DBU258-266

Leyland PD1/3

470977-78/
1043-44/147-
48/255-56/386

Roe

H31/25R

No. 246 to South East Lancashire and North East Cheshire (SELNEC) PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5246).
Withdrawn 1966 (242-243, 245, 247-252, 254-255, 257, 259-260, 263-264, 266), 1967 (244, 253, 256, 258, 261, 265), 1968 (262).

1948

267-278

DBU267-278

Leyland PD1/3

472352/563/
66-67/80701-
04/44-47

Roe

H31/25R

279-288

DBU279-288

Leyland PD1/3

480900-02/
1185-86/903/
1093-96

Roe

H31/25R

289-291

DBU289-291

Leyland PD1/3

481521-23

Roe

H31/25R

292-301

DBU292-301

Crossley SD42/3

97315/17-19/
21-26

Roe

B32F

302-311

EBU465-74

Crossley DD42/5

94119/12/18/
15/100/13/10/
05-06/16

Crossley

H30/26R

312-321

EBU912-21

Daimler CVD6

14779-83/86/
88-90/94

Roe

H31/25R

337

EBU867

Leyland PD2/3

482793

Roe

H31/25R

No. 299 re-bodied with 1951 Crossley B32F body ex-Southport CT (No. 117) in 1965.
Withdrawn 1961 (292, 294), 1963 (295, 302-304, 307, 311), 1964 (293, 296, 298, 300-301, 305-306, 309-310, 313-314, 319-320), 1965 (308, 312, 315, 317-318), 1966 (268, 274, 276, 280, 282, 287, 290, 297, 316, 321, 337), 1967 (267, 269, 271, 278, 281, 283, 286, 299), 1968 (272-273, 277, 279, 284-285, 288).

1949

322-331

EBU922-31

Daimler CVD6

14791/84/92/
85/93/87/95/
98/96/801

Crossley

H30/26R

332-336

EBU932-36

Daimler CVD6

14797/802/
799/803/00

Crossley

H30/25R

Withdrawn 1966 (322-336).

1950

338-351

EBU868-81

Leyland PD2/3

491241-44/
4359/429-30/
74-75/576-77/
620-21/839

Roe

H31/25R

352-361

FBU639-48

Leyland PD2/3

494840-42/
5535-40/6455

Roe

H31/25R

362-365

FBU821-24

Crossley SD42/7

98153/85/
87/96

Roe

B32F

366-69

FBU825-28

Crossley DD42/8

95307/04/06/
05

Crossley

H30/26R

Nos. 341-342, 345, 349, 360 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5241-5242, 5245, 5249, 5260 respectively).
Withdrawn 1963 (367), 1964 (363, 365), 1965 (369), 1966 (364, 366), 1967 (362, 368), 1968 (338-340, 343-344, 347, 351, 355, 358-359).

1952

370-72

HBU123-25

Leyland PD2/12

520515/
716-17

Leyland

H30/26R

No. 370 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5270).
Withdrawn 1968 (371-372).

1954

378-387

KBU373-82

Leyland PD2/20

541126-28/
81-82/226-27/
73-75

Roe

H31/25R

Nos. 378-387 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5278-5287 respectively).

1955

373-377

KBU383-87

Leyland PD2/20

540829-31/
37-38

Metro-Cammell

H30/26R

Nos. 373-377 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5273-5277 respectively).

1957

388-407

NBU488-07

Leyland PD2/20

562749-52/
857-60/63-66/
984-87/3003-
05/70003

Roe

H33/27R

408-412

NBU508-12

Leyland PD2/20

570004/
63317/70032-
33/40

Crossley

H33/28R

413-418

NBU513-18

Leyland PD2/20

570041-46

NCME

H33/28R

Nos. 388-418 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5288-5318 respectively).

1958

419-428

PBU919-28

Leyland PD2/30

581329-32/
37-39/66-68

Metro-Cammell

H37/28R

429-452

PBU929-52

Leyland PD2/30

581388-90/
97-98/487-89/
504-06/638/
59/39/60-61/
815-17/29-33

Roe

H37/28R

453-462

PBU953-62

Leyland PD2/30

581675/399/
674/77/02-03/
400/601/507/
676

NCME

H37/28R

Nos. 419-462 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5319-5362 respectively).

1964

101-110

101-10HBU

Leyland PD3/5

L20143/237/
144/238/145/
239/146/240/
147/241

Roe

H41/32F

111-114

111-14JBU

Leyland PSUC1/13

L30828-31

Marshall

B41D

Nos. 101-107, 109-110, 111-114 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5101-5107, 5109-5110, 5011-5014 respectively).
Withdrawn 1968 (108 after accident damage).

1965

115-116

115-16JBU

Leyland PSUC1/13

L30847-48

Pennine

B41D

121-130

CBU121-30C

Leyland PDR1/1

L23965-67/
4012-13/74-
75/173-74/97

Roe

H43/34F

463

LWE104

Leyland PD2/1

491497

Leyland

H33/26R

464-466

LWE109-111

Leyland PD2/1

492077/
3380-81

Leyland

H30/26R

467

ACP392

Leyland PD2/1

480637

Leyland

H33/26R

468

ACP385

Leyland PD2/1

472241

Leyland

H33/26R

469

ACP388

Leyland PD2/1

472238

Leyland

H33/26R

470

ACP390

Leyland PD2/1

472315

Leyland

H33/26R

471-472

DBN329-30

Leyland PD2/4

485150/717

Leyland

H32/26R

473

DBN337

Leyland PD2/4

485806

Leyland

H32/26R

474

DBN342

Leyland PD2/4

485805

Leyland

H32/26R

Nos. 463-66 ex-Sheffield CT (Nos. 604, 609-611, new 1949).
Nos. 467-70 ex-Halifax CT (Nos. 108, 111, 114, 116, new 1947).
Nos. 471-74 ex-Bolton CT (Nos. 426-427, 434, 438, new 1949).
Nos. 115-116, 121-130, 463-466, 471-474 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5015-5016, 5121-5130, 5363-5366, 5371-5374 respectively, although LWE104 and LWE111 never carried their fleet numbers).

1966

131-135

GBU131-35D

Leyland PDR1/1

L44641-42/
742-43/812

East Lancs

H43/34F

136-147

GBU136-47D

Leyland PDR1/1

L44811/62-64/
959/5117/
60131-32/50-
52/224

Roe

H43/34F

475-476

OWB856-57

Leyland PD2/10

521394/52

Leyland

H33/28R

477

OWB859

Leyland PD2/10

521519

Leyland

H33/28R

478

OWB861

Leyland PD2/10

521395

Leyland

H33/28R

Nos. 131-147 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5131-5147 respectively).
Nos. 475-478 ex-Sheffield CT (Nos. 656-657, 659, 661, new 1952); to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5375-5378 respectively).

1967

117-120

LBU117-20E

Leyland PSRC1/1

L73057-58/
147-48

Marshall

B45D

148-152

LBU148-52E

Leyland PDR1/1

L63128-29/
497-98/664

Neepsend

H43/34F

153-160

LBU153-60E

Leyland PDR1/1

L63789-90/
936-37/
64095-97/204

Roe

H43/34F

Nos. 117-120, 148-160 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5017-5020, 5148-5160 respectively).

1968

161-171

OBU161-71F

Leyland PDR1/1

702805-07/
90-91/3013-
14/64-65/
389-90

Roe

H43/34F

172-177

OBU172-77F

Leyland PSUR1/1

703267-70/
383-84

Marshall

B48D

Nos. 161-171, 172-177 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5161-5171, 5022-5027 respectively).

1969

178-182

SBU178-82G

Leyland PDR1A/1

?

Roe

H43/31D

Nos. 178-182 to SELNEC PTE 11/69 (re-numbered 5178-5182 respectively).


|

 


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stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/oldham-corporation-transport-fleet-list Tue, 20 Feb 2018 16:35:17 GMT
TRAFFIC AREA OFFICES AND BADGE CODES http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/traffic-area-offices-and-badge-codes TRAFFIC AREA OFFICES AND BADGE CODES

With the introduction of the 1930 Road Traffic Act the Country was split into 12 Traffic Areas.

Each was given a distinguishing letter, as shown in the list below.

The location of the issuing office is also shown.

A - NORTHERN - NEWCASTLE

B - YORKSHIRE - LEEDS
C - NORTH WESTERN - MANCHESTER
D - WEST MIDLANDS - BIRMINGHAM
E - EAST MIDLANDS - NOTTINGHAM
F - EASTERN - CAMBRIDGE
G - SOUTH WALES - CARDIFF
H - WESTERN - BRISTOL
J - SOUTHERN - READING
K - SOUTH EASTERN - EASTBOURNE
L - SCOTTISH (SUB AREA) - ABERDEEN
M - SCOTTISH - EDINBURGH
N - METROPOLITAN - LONDON

 

PSV Badges when originally issued, were of an oval enamel design, on a leather hanging strap, and had the same distinguishing letter with the number underneath.

An example of an early Drivers Badge from the Northern Traffic Area is shown below.

 

These hanging badges were replaced on 1st January 1935 by the more familiar round badge.

The reason for this change was believed to be because when Drivers were swinging the starting handle on the old type buses, the badge flew up in to their face and caused injury. How true this is I do not know, but it sounds reasonable.

They were originally made of a material called 'Traffolyte', and then later in Formica, and much later in Plastic.

The font style differed over the years as did the shade/colour of the edge, as different manufacturers were used.

 

The badge numbering started at 1001

An early badge, again from the Northern Traffic Area, is shown below. This would be the 2088th badge issued in c1935/6.

 

Below are the addresses and Counties covered by the 12 different Traffic Area Offices.

The 2 digit badge code is shown after the name of the office.

Further down it shows 'xx Drivers Badge' or 'xx Conductors Badge', if you click on that, it will take you to the badge page for that area, and Driver or Conductor.

Please report any broken links through the Contact Me page.

 

 

NORTHERN TRAFFIC AREA (AA)
Low Friar House
36-42, Low Friar Street
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 5XR

'AA' DRIVER BADGES

'AA' CONDUCTORS BADGES

COUNTIES COVERED
Cumberland, Durham, Northumberland, Westmorland, part of North West Lancashire and part of the North and West Riding of Yorkshire.

 


YORKSHIRE TRAFFIC AREA (BB)
Hillcrest House
386 Harehills Lane
Leeds
LS9 6NF


'BB' DRIVER BADGES
'BB' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED
Yorkshire (except the parts included in Northern Traffic Area), part of north east Derbyshire, and part of north west Nottinghamshire.


NORTH WESTERN TRAFFIC AREA (CC)
Arkwright House
Parsonage Gardens
Deansgate
Manchester
M60 9AN


'CC' DRIVERS BADGES
'CC' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED
Anglesey, Caernarvonshire, Cheshire, Denbighshire, Flintshire, Merionethshire, Montgomeryshire, part of north west Derbyshire, and Lancashire (except the part included in Northern Traffic Area).


WEST MIDLANDS TRAFFIC AREA (DD)
Cumberland House
200 Broad Street
Birmingham
B15 1TD


'DD' DRIVERS BADGES
'DD' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED 
Herefordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire.


EAST MIDLANDS TRAFFIC AREA (EE)
Birkbeck House
14-16 Trinity Square
Nottingham
NG1 4BA

 
'EE' DRIVERS BADGES
'EE' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED 
Nottinghamshire (except the part included in Yorkshire Traffic Area), Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, a small part of north-west Huntingdon and Peterborough, Oxfordshire, Rutland, part of south-west Bedfordshire, part of north-west Berkshire, Buckinghamshire (except the part included in Metropolitan Traffic Area), Derbyshire, (except the parts included in Yorkshire and North-Western Traffic Areas), and Lincolnshire (except the south part of Holland which is included in Eastern Traffic Area).


EASTERN TRAFFIC AREA (FF)
Sussex House
Hobson Street
Cambridge
CB1 1NR


'FF' DRIVERS BADGES  
'FF' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED
Cambridgeshire and Isle of Ely, Norfolk, Suffolk, Bedfordshire (except the parts included in East Midland and Metropolitan Traffic Areas), Essex (except the part included in the Metropolitan Traffic Area), Huntingdon and Peterborough (except the part in the East Midland Traffic Area) and the south part of Holland (Lincs).


SOUTH WALES TRAFFIC AREA (GG)
Dominions House
Dominions Arcade
Queen street
Cardiff
CF1 4XW


'GG' DRIVERS BADGES
'GG' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED
Brecknockshire, Cardiganshire, Carmarthenshire, Glamorgan, Monmouthshire, Pembrokeshire, and Radnorshire.


WESTERN TRAFFIC AREA (HH)
The Gaunts' House
Denmark Street
Bristol
BS1 5DR


'HH' DRIVERS BADGES
'HH' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED 
Cornwall, Devon, Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire and Dorsetshire (except the part included in the South-Eastern Traffic Area), and a small part of West Hampshire.


SOUTHERN TRAFFIC AREA (J)
Somerset House
Blagrave Street
Reading
Berkshire

THIS TRAFFIC AREA WAS SHORT LIVED AND WAS CLOSED ON 31st DECEMBER 1934.


'J' DRIVERS BADGES
'J' CONDUCTORS BADGES - THERE ARE NO PICTURES OF 'J' BADGES AS YET.

COUNTIES COVERED
The administration Counties of Oxford, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Dorset, Southampton, and the Isle of Wight.
So much of the administrative county of Bucks as comprises the borough of Chepping Wycombe, and the urban districts of Beaconsfield, Marlow, and Slough, and the rural districts of Eton, Wycombe and Hambledon.
The County boroughs of Oxford, Reading, Bournemouth, Portsmouth, and Southampton.

THE AREA BEING MERGED INTO THE SURROUNDING AREAS. 


SOUTH EASTERN TRAFFIC AREA (KK)
Ivy House
1-5 Ivy Terrace
Eastbourne


'KK' DRIVERS BADGES
'KK' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED
Hampshire (except the small western part included in the Western Traffic Area), the Isle of Wight, Kent and Sussex (except the parts included in Metropolitan Traffic Area), Berkshire (except the part included in the East Midland Traffic Area), part of south-east Dorsetshire, and south-west Surrey.



SCOTTISH TRAFFIC AREA (SUB OFFICE) (LL)
Northern Division
Greyfriars House
Gallowgate
Aberdeen AB9 2ZS


THIS OFFICE WAS CLOSED AT THE END OF MARCH 1984 AND THE WORK TRANSFERRED TO THE EDINBURGH OFFICE.

UNUSED 'LL' DRIVERS BADGES WERE SUPPLIED TO OTHER OFFICES TO BE ISSUED WHEN BADGES BECAME SHORT TOWARDS THE END OF BADGE ISSUE IN 1991.

KNOWN OFFICES TO ISSUE 'LL' BADGES WERE BIRMINGHAM, AND LONDON.

'LL' DRIVERS BADGES
'LL' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED 
Aberdeenshire, Angus, Banffshire, Caithness, Clackmannan, Fife, Inverness-shire, Kincardine, Kinross, Moray, Nairn, Orkney, Perth, Ross and Croarty, Suthland, and Zetland.


SCOTTISH TRAFFIC AREA (MM)
24 Tophichen Street
Edinburgh
EH3 8HD


'MM' DRIVERS BADGES
'MM' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED 
Argyll, Ayrshire, Berwickshire, Bute, Dumfriesshire, Dunbartonshire, East Lothian, Kirkcudbright, Lanarkshire, Midlothian, Peeblesshire, Renfrewshire, Roxburgshire, Selkirkshire, Stirlingshire, West Lothian, and Wigtownshire.


METROPOLITAN TRAFFIC AREA (N) PSV BADGES & (T) TROLLEYBUS AND TRAM STAFF.
P.O. Box 643
Government Buildings
Bromyard avenue
Acton
London W3


'N' DRIVERS BADGES
'N' CONDUCTORS BADGES

'T' DRIVERS BADGES

'T' CONDUCTORS BADGES


COUNTIES COVERED 
Hertfordshire, Greater London, Surrey (except the part included in South Eastern Traffic Area), part of south Bedfordshire, part of south-east Buckinghamshire, part of south-west Essex, part of West Kent, and the northern part of Sussex.

 

The issuing of PSV Badges was discontinued on the following dates:-

CONDUCTORS BADGES on the 31st July 1980.

DRIVERS BADGES on the 31st March 1991.

 

 

 

 

]]>
stephenhowarthbadges@yahoo.co.uk (STEPHEN HOWARTHS' WEBSITE) http://stephenhowarth.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/2/traffic-area-offices-and-badge-codes Tue, 20 Feb 2018 15:55:09 GMT